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Things to Do With Infant Twins

by Sara Ipatenco

Infant twins come with twice the work and twice the diapers, but they also bring twice the fun. While you won't have a lot of free time between feeding, diapering and bathing your twins, you can pack that small amount of down time with entertaining activities that will promote intellectual and physical development, as well as bring enjoyment to you and your babies.

Indoor Activities

Taking two babies outside or out in public can be physically draining, but you can entertain your little ones just as easily inside your house. Turn on upbeat music and take turns dancing your twins around the living room. Place your babies on their tummies, get down the floor with them and show them their toys, read them board books or just talk to them. In addition to being entertaining, this tummy time will also help your babies build their gross motor skills. Older babies might enjoy scribbling on a piece of paper with crayons or finger-painting with instant pudding spread on highchair trays. If your twins can sit up on their own, run a shallow bath and let them splash around in the water. Give them a few infant bath toys to make the water play even more enjoyable and educational.

Outdoor Activities

On pleasant weather days, a little outside time will stimulate the senses and teach your little ones about the big world around them. Lay a blanket on the grass and let your twins have tummy time outside. Let them feel the grass, crush leaves in their hands or watch the birds fly. Be careful to watch them to prevent them from putting nature into their mouth. Blow bubbles and let your twins reach for them or put them in a double stroller and take them for a walk around the neighborhood. Point objects out to your twins and tell them what they are. Engaging in this one-sided dialogue helps build their vocabulary and language skills.

Away From Home

If you're planning an excursion out of the house such as to the mall or a museum, your infant twins might enjoy themselves as much as you will. Most babies like to look around at all the new sights and many also relish the attention they receive from other shoppers or patrons. Even activities that you would normally reserve for older children can be entertaining for your twins. Take them to the zoo and they'll probably become quite fascinated by watching the animals in their pens or the fish swimming in their aquariums. Many public libraries offer story and music time for babies and your little ones might like hearing a short story and listening to baby-friendly music.

Additional Tips

Because twins are rare, be prepared to attract a good deal of attention when you venture out, advises Christina Boyle and Cathleen Stahl, authors of "Twin Set: Moms of Multiples Share Survive and Thrive Secrets." If you're uncomfortable with strangers touching their cheeks or stroking their hands, have a plan in place to prevent that. You might cover the stroller with a light blanket or simply ask people to refrain from touching your babies. Prepare for any activity ahead of time, whether you'll be doing it at home or out and about. Have diapers and wipes on hand, as well as a spare set of clothes and a back-up pacifier. If your twins don't seem interested in the activity, switch gears and find something else to do. Babies don't have long attention spans and they tend to get overstimulated easily. Follow their cues to guide your daily activities. If they seem content, keep on going. If they start to get fussy and aren't hungry, wet or tired, they might need something else to entertain them.

References

  • KidsHealth: Parenting Multiples
  • Twin Set: Moms of Multiples Share Survive and Thrive Secrets; Christina Boyle and Cathleen Stahl
  • Having Twins -- And More; Elizabeth Noble, et al.

About the Author

Sara Ipatenco has taught writing, health and nutrition. She started writing in 2007 and has been published in Teaching Tolerance magazine. Ipatenco holds a bachelor's degree and a master's degree in education, both from the University of Denver.

Photo Credits

  • Digital Vision./Photodisc/Getty Images