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How to Tell a Brother You Love Him

by Zora Hughes, studioD

He may have teased you mercilessly as a child, but your brother could be one of the most influential people in your life. There is growing evidence of how much siblings help shape each other's lives, says family studies professor Laurie Kramer, in an article for "U.S. News and World Report." The impacts extend to how people handle stress and interact with others. Although he might not be one for overly emotional displays of affection, you can express your love to your brother in meaningful ways.

Just say it. Your brother might want to hear directly from you that you love him. If the two of you have had a tense relationship in the past, saying "Just so you know, I love you, no matter what" can be a big step in moving your relationship forward.

Write him a letter. If you have a hard time expressing emotions, writing it down in a heartfelt letter or note can be effective. You might say it in a birthday card. You can inject humor by mentioning something from your childhood. For example, you could say something like, "Despite all those times you gave me a wedgie in public, I love you bro."

Tell him in a creative manner. Let your brother know you love him in an unexpected way. Post a picture of the two of you when you were young on a social networking page on National Siblings Day, which is April 10. It could be a funny or slightly embarrassing picture, like him picking him nose, with a caption like "Had to do it bro! Ha-ha, happy National Sibs Day. I love you." You could send him a slideshow of pictures of the two of you growing up, or send him a video message from your family expressing love to him on his birthday.

Show him you love him through your actions. Actions speak louder than words. Show up for his big events, whether it's his wedding or his first marathon. Surprise him by flying across the country to celebrate a birthday with him. If you can't be with him during his special moments, send a care package with items related to the event so he knows you care.


  • Improve your relationship with your brother by letting go of childhood slights, not participating in family gossip related to your brother and respecting each other as adults, recommends family relationship expert and author Jane Isay in an article for "Real Simple."

About the Author

Based in Los Angeles, Zora Hughes has been writing travel, parenting, cooking and relationship articles since 2010. Her work includes writing city profiles for Groupon. She also writes screenplays and won the S. Randolph Playwriting Award in 2004. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in television writing/producing and a Master of Arts Management in entertainment media management, both from Columbia College.

Photo Credits

  • James Woodson/Digital Vision/Getty Images