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How to Study for a High School Diploma at Home

by Sara Ipatenco

Most high schools around the country require teens to pass a test that covers math, science, literacy and history to receive their high school diploma. You'll also need to take a test if you dropped out of high school and want to work on getting your diploma as an adult. Studying at home will help you gain the knowledge you need to pass the exam, and it will prepare you go even further and enroll in college. Because so much is riding on your passing the test, set aside plenty of time to study, and you're more likely to ace the exam on the first try.

Designate an area of your home to be your study area. Choose a spot that's quiet and free of distractions, such as a barking dog or a ringing telephone.

Stock your study area with any materials you need to study effectively. You might include such things as paper and pens for taking notes and a calculator to practice your math skills.

Make a studying plan. When you set aside a specific time to spend studying and build it into your daily schedule, you're more likely to actually use that time to prepare for the high school diploma test. According to KidsHealth, 45 minutes is a good goal because it's about the maximum amount of time you'll be able to give your full attention to the material you're reviewing.

Obtain a high school diploma study guide. These are sold in most bookstores and can also be purchased online. The guide will include tips for taking the test, but it will also give you an idea of what kinds of questions will appear on the test.

Take practice tests. Most study guides include at least one practice test, but you can often get more online or from a bookstore. Adhere to the time limits for each section of the test so you get some practice taking the test within a certain amount of time.

Score your practice test. Take note of what you need more practice with and build that into your study time. Use the study guide and outside materials, such as the Internet or library books, to enhance your studying time and build the knowledge you'll need on the day of the big test.

Invite a few friends that also need to take the test to study with you. Forming a study group builds your knowledge because you're working with peers to learn new things and it also allows you to give and get support.

About the Author

Sara Ipatenco has taught writing, health and nutrition. She started writing in 2007 and has been published in Teaching Tolerance magazine. Ipatenco holds a bachelor's degree and a master's degree in education, both from the University of Denver.

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