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How to Store Baby Formula When Leaving the House

by Kathryn Hatter, studioD

When your baby drinks formula, you may have additional feeding concerns – especially when you leave the house. Storing baby formula depends on the type of formula you use, as different kinds of formula have different serving and storing recommendations for safety. Failure to follow storage instructions and recommendations could cause bacteria to occur in the formula, which might make an infant sick, states the U.S. Food Safety website.

Place unopened ready-to-feed formula directly into a diaper bag or food bag to carry while you’re away from home. It is not necessary to refrigerate or chill ready-to-eat formula.

Prepare powdered or liquid concentrate formula according to package instructions at least one hour prior to leaving the house, advises Simmons College.

Place the prepared formula into the refrigerator to chill it for at least one hour prior to packing it.

Place frozen ice packs into a small cooler or insulated bag. Place the prepared formula into the cooler or bag and close it.

Use the formula within four hours of placing it into the cooler or bag. Alternatively, move the formula out of the cooler or bag within four hours and place it into the refrigerator. Use the formula within 24 hours of preparing it if you refrigerate it again.

Items you will need
  •  Ice packs
  •  Small cooler or insulated bag


  • If your baby eats a portion of a bottle you had stored while out but he does not finish it, throw away the remaining contents of the bottle to avoid getting your baby sick.
  • If you cannot keep prepared formula chilled properly while you are away from home, pack the water you need to make the formula and pack the concentrated or powdered formula separately. This lets you make the formula as you need it, according to the Health Link BC website.


  • If your formula storage measures fail to meet these guidelines, throw the formula away without feeding it to your baby or you may risk your baby’s health, advises the Kids Health website.

About the Author

Kathryn Hatter is a veteran home-school educator, as well as an accomplished gardener, quilter, crocheter, cook, decorator and digital graphics creator. As a regular contributor to Natural News, many of Hatter's Internet publications focus on natural health and parenting. Hatter has also had publication on home improvement websites such as Redbeacon.

Photo Credits

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