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Steaming a Chiffon Wedding Dress

by Melissa J. Bell

A sheer, soft material with a plain weave, chiffon often adorns flowing, billowing clothing like formal dresses and wedding gowns. This lightweight fabric drapes beautifully and typically forms the lovely gathers, pleats, ruffles and flares that make a feminine garment worth wearing. Easily damaged by heat and often stretched beyond its original shape by pressing, chiffon cannot take standard ironing, even on a low or silk-appropriate setting. Instead, wrinkled chiffon requires delicate steaming before an important event like a wedding.

Turn on the shower so it's as hot as possible and pull the shower curtain closed or shut the shower door.

Spread towels over the floor to collect any excess moisture from the steam. Close the bathroom door and let steam fill the room. Once the room is steamy, turn off the water to avoid splashing the dress by accident.

Take the wedding dress into the bathroom and close the door. Hang the dress on the back of the door, either on a hanger slung over the top of the door or on a garment hook.

Smooth out wrinkles in the chiffon with your hands as the steam softens the fibers. The combination of steam and pressure helps relax the fabric.

Remove the dress from the bathroom after the steam dissipates and the room cools. If wrinkles remain, fill the tank of a handheld garment steamer with water and turn it to a low setting.

Hang up the dress and drape a clean white towel over a wrinkled section to protect it from accidental water droplets. Steamers can sometimes spit water, which is disastrous for a chiffon dress.

Hold the steamer nozzle several inches from the dress. Move the nozzle from side to side and bottom to top over the wrinkled areas for several minutes.

Turn off the steamer and uncover the dress. Let it air dry on the hanger before putting it on or storing it.

Items you will need
  • Bathroom with shower
  • White towels
  • Garment hanger
  • Handheld garment steamer

Warning

  • Keep the steamer nozzle directed away from your body to avoid injury.

References

  • Sewing Smart with Fabric; Jeanne Stauffer
  • Sew Any Fabric: A Quick Reference to Fabrics from A to Z; Claire Shaeffer
  • Your Day, Your Way: The Essential Handbook for the 21st-Century Bride; Sharon Naylor, Michelle Roth and Henry Roth
  • eBay Timesaving Techniques for Dummies; Marsha Collier

About the Author

A writer with a Bachelor of Science in English and secondary education, but also an interest in all things beautiful, Melissa J. Bell has handed out beauty and fashion advice since she could talk -- and for the last six years, write for online publications like Daily Glow and SheBudgets.

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images