our everyday life

How to Start a New Life After Heartbreak

by Christa Orion, studioD

A week or more spent face down on your bed, listening to your favorite love song over and over is plenty of time to get over the initial shock of a heartbreak. Peeling yourself from the dark world of sadness is hard work. Getting back on your feet and starting a new life is only a step away.

Let It Out

It's OK to let the tears fly.

Those countless nights of crying incessantly will be only a memory eventually. Therese Borchard, associate edior at Psych Central, outlines the importance of grieving in getting over a heartbreak in an article on PBS.org. Give yourself time to grieve. Just as time and care heal a visible wound, time will heal the unseen wounds of losing your love. Let yourself cry. Take time to reflect on the lost relationship and come to peace.

Find Yourself

Having a good time will take your mind off of the heartache.

For a while now, you have identified with being a pair. Romantic relationships may cause you to lose touch with certain interests and hobbies that you had when you were on your own. Now is the time to get back in touch with the person you used to be. Get out of the house and do things you love to do. Go to the movies with your best friend, roller blade or go for a jog through the park. Not only are there positive emotional effects from staying active, but it is great for your physical health as well.

Tap Your Resources

A friend can provide support during a life change.

The questions and confusion associated with heartbreak can put a damper in the urge to start a new life. The article "Staying Strong After a Break Up" recommends finding a support network to assist you in getting back on track. Sometimes the voice you need to hear is a lot closer than you think. Friends or family have shoulders to cry on, and they will listen when you need someone to talk to. Use resources for support and understanding during this time of transition.

Be Good to Yourself

Susan Elliott J.D.,M.Ed., certified grief counselor and life coach, recommends that you dedicate this new phase of life to yourself. Put a stop to constant thoughts of what was or what could have been. It takes time to get back to normal on an emotional level. Take care of yourself. Tell yourself, "I deserve to be happy." This is a new beginning.

About the Author

Christa Orion is a psychologist in training with focus on family and relationship health. She has years of experience working with individuals going through domestic issues.

Photo Credits

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