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What Is Sincere Friendship?

by Karen Kleinschmidt, studioD

A sincere friend is one who gives without expecting anything from you in return. Sincere friendship allows both people to embrace and accept each other's differences and use them to enhance the relationship. It allows you the freedom to be your unique self. A sincere friendship is built on a foundation of trust and safety. The two of you connect on a regular basis, know you can always turn to each other in a time of need and have a safety net for your deepest secrets. Sincere friendship allows you both to express your ideas and opinions while growing and learning from each other.

Honesty Equals Sincerity

Many people desire one or two real friends who watch out for them no matter what. A sincere friend will find a way to tell you something that may be difficult for you to hear. For example, she will tell you if she suspects you drink too much even if saying that to you presents the possibility that you may become angry and irrational and walk away from the friendship. Dr. Alex Lickerman states in an article on the Psychology Today website that a sincere friend is not malicious; she will point out things that may be hard to hear only when she believes that telling you this information is in your best interests.

Distance Doesn't Separate

A sincere friendship is not characterized by the amount of time you spend together; the two of you are able to pick up right where you left off, even if it's only once every few months. True friends maintain their independence and avoid unhealthy dependency, as they know it is impossible to always be there for one another, according to Barton Goldsmith, Ph.D., in an article for Psychology Today. A true friend is one who will be there no matter how long it's been since you've seen him, will listen to you complain and support you and offer advice as needed.

Trusting Heart

A sincere friend is your confidant, meaning you can share your deepest secrets with her as well as have her trust that you will hold her secrets as well. Your relationship with a true friend runs deep. The friendship works both ways; she will allow you to see the darkest parts of her life and you allow her entry into yours, says Goldsmith. If the two of you have an argument or some other conflict that causes a rift, forgiveness will likely be extended, and you can trust your friend not to continue to bring up the past.

Connect Regularly

Even if you have to make a "date" and mark it on your calendars, true friends make the time to be with each other, connect and share details of the happenings in their lives. Sincere friends avoid keeping score regarding who calls or initiates contact, according to Carolyn Baana, associate certified coach with the International Coach Federation. When the opportunity arises, sincere friends treasure the time that they have together talking and listening to one another face-to-face, chatting via Skype or talking on the phone.

About the Author

Karen Kleinschmidt has been writing since 2007. Her short stories and articles have appeared in "Grandma's Choice," "Treasure Box" and "Simple Joy." She has worked with children with ADHD, sensory issues and behavioral problems, as well as adults with chronic mental illness. Kleinschmidt holds a Bachelor of Arts in psychology from Montclair State University.

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