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How to Serve Sauerkraut

by Nicole Adams, studioD

Sauerkraut, a naturally fermented cabbage dish, is one of the best food sources for probiotics. Probiotics are live bacteria beneficial in keeping your gut healthy. Sauerkraut has a mildly tart flavor, is salty and provides a light crunch. It is tasty to eat on its own or paired with rich, fatty foods. Sauerkraut complements meat, cheese, potatoes, cream-based soups and even spicy dishes.

Enjoy sauerkraut as is. The salt fermentation of the cabbage gives it a light, tart flavor that balances the saltiness. Eat sauerkraut when you are looking for something slightly sour and low in calories. Add other seasonings to enhance the flavor, such as black pepper, basil or parsley. Mix in additional ingredients to round out the natural flavor, such as minced garlic or onion, and chopped celery or carrots. Spice up the sauerkraut with horseradish, hot sauce, cayenne pepper or crushed red pepper.

Add sauerkraut to a salad you have already made since it has an acidic bite similar to vinegar, or build a salad around the sauerkraut. Whether you have just topped your green salad with a creamy dressing or a vinaigrette, a pile of sauerkraut will tastefully top it off. Add sauerkraut to coleslaw, egg salad, pasta salad or potato salad. Make sauerkraut the main star by adding chopped vegetables such as carrots, celery, tomato and cucumber, then toss the salad with a mayonnaise- or yogurt-based dressing.

Serve sauerkraut hot, though raising the temperature of sauerkraut may kill off the beneficial bacteria, it is still a delicious accompaniment to a variety of hot dishes. Top your soups, stews or chowders with sauerkraut, or create a soup based solely on the fermented cabbage. Add sauerkraut to casseroles or hot pasta dishes with a creamy sauce. Stir sauerkraut into omelettes, serve atop meat or mix it into mashed potatoes. Throw some sauerkraut into spicy stir-fry dishes or even add it into desserts such as cakes and cookies.


  • Buy sauerkraut that has been fermented in salt, not vinegar.
  • Make your own sauerkraut for the freshest product.

About the Author

Nicole Adams is an accomplished writer, publishing in print and online. She has submitted hundreds of articles for websites, including CBS Local and Education.com. Adams earned a Bachelor of Science in psychology with concentrated studies in health and nutrition, and animal behavior and nutrition. She loves to cook and volunteers in animal rescue.

Photo Credits

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