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Salary Range for a Senior Logistics Analyst

by Brenda Scottsdale, studioD

Logistics analysts determine the most efficient way to get materials, services or output from origin to destination. At the senior management level, logistics executives supervise and guide employees, taking ultimate responsibility for all logistical planning for their companies. This work requires strategic, analytic thinking and mastery of technology-based logistics tools. Men and women are flocking to this career, because earnings potential and demand are high.

Education and Training

The Council of Logistics Management reports that most logistics analysts have at least a four-year degree with a major in logistics, which more than 50 universities in the U.S. currently offer. Many also have a graduate degree in business. Even though a graduate degree isn't mandatory at the senior level, this credential helps differentiate candidates and builds skills in areas such as strategic planning, financial management and analytic thinking.

Average Salaries

The national average wage for a senior logistics analysts as of 2013 was $76,000, according to the career and job site Simply Hired. Geographic differences appear among 10 randomly selected states that include North Dakota, $63,000; Alabama, $65,000; Utah, $69,000; Florida, $70,000; Texas, $71,000; Pennsylvania, $73,000; Ohio, $73,000; Illinois, $80,000; Maryland, $86,000; and New York, $89,000.

Senior Management

The Council of Logistics Management reports even higher earning potential for executives at the director level, with an average annual salary of $138,600 annually in 1997. The average yearly starting salaries for directors was $85,000, while those at the 90th percentile had an average salary of $221,100. Vice presidents had an average starting salary of $93,400. Their average salary was $182,200. At the 90th percentile, the average salary for vice presidents was $288,500. Top earners in this field reported making more than $500,000 annually.


The Council of Logistics Management reports more positions for logistics analysts than college graduates in the field. Demand is also high for senior logistics analysts. The council indicates factors such as increasing awareness of the importance of logistics, six-figure salaries, appeal to men and women and aggressive recruiting efforts are predominant trends affecting this field.

About the Author

Brenda Scottsdale is a licensed psychologist, a six sigma master black belt and a certified aerobics instructor. She has been writing professionally for more than 15 years in scientific journals, including the "Journal of Criminal Justice and Behavior" and various websites.

Photo Credits

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