our everyday life

How to Get a Ring That's Too Big to Fit Temporarily

by Melissa King, studioD

Whether it's costume jewelry or your wedding band, a ring that doesn't fit can be annoying. If your ring is just a bit too big, you don't need to get it resized at a jeweler. Instead, you can do the job yourself with ring resizing gel or a simple piece of tape.

Ring Resizing Gel

Dampen a cotton swab with rubbing alcohol. Wipe all surfaces of the ring band with the rubbing alcohol to remove any oils or debris. This will help the resizing gel adhere better.

Remove the lid from the resizing gel tube. Gently squeeze a small droplet of the gel onto the bottom inner part of the band only.

Use the tube's nozzle or a small object, such as a paperclip, to smooth out the gel.

Wipe off any excess gel with a towel. Wait up to 24 hours for the gel to dry completely.

Try on the ring. If it's still too big, add another layer of resizing gel, then wait for it to dry and try it on again. If it's too small, scrape off some of the gel using your fingernail or a blunt knife.

Reapply the gel when it wears off -- between two weeks and two months depending on how often you wear the ring.


Cut a 2- to 3-inch piece of adhesive tape or packing tape. If you're using packing tape, cut the piece in half down the center so it won't be too wide for the ring.

Roll the tape into a tight tube with the adhesive side facing out. Make the tube wide enough so that it provides excellent adhesion but narrow enough to remain concealed when the ring is worn.

Press the tape against the top or bottom inside band of the ring, depending on what feels most comfortable to you. If you're wearing a statement ring with a large setting, conceal the tape beneath the setting.

Try the ring on. If the tape is positioned properly, it should not be visible.

Items you will need
  •  Cotton swab
  •  Rubbing alcohol
  •  Resizing gel
  •  Paperclip (optional)
  •  Towel
  •  Knife (optional)
  •  Tape

About the Author

Melissa King began writing in 2001. She spent three years writing for her local newspaper, "The Colt," writing editorials, news stories, product reviews and entertainment pieces. She is also the owner and operator of Howbert Freelance Writing. King holds an Associate of Arts in communications from Tarrant County College.

Photo Credits

  • Goodshoot/Goodshoot/Getty Images