our everyday life

How to Revive Dry Brown Sugar

by Jenny Harrington, studioD

A hard lump of brown sugar can throw a wrench into your baking plans. Instead of rushing out to the store for a new bag, take a few minutes and revive your existing store of sugar. Brown sugar contains molasses. As the moisture from the molasses evaporates, the sugar can dry out and turn into a cement-like lump. You can quickly add moisture with the help of heat if you need to soften the sugar quickly.

Place the lump of hardened brown sugar in a microwave-safe bowl. The rim of the bowl must sit higher than the lump of sugar.

Lay a slice of soft bread or a slightly dampened paper towel on top of the sugar. Cover the entire bowl with a layer of plastic wrap.

Heat the bowl in the microwave for 10 to 20 seconds, then check the sugar. Continue to heat in 10-second increments until the lump has softened enough to measure and use. Avoid overheating, which can burn or liquefy the sugar.

Measure out the amount of sugar needed and place the remainder in an airtight storage container. Place fresh slice of bread, a slightly moistened towel or two or three fresh apple slices in the container; otherwise, the brown sugar will harden again as it cools.

Place the lid tightly on the container and store. Remove the bread, towel or apple slices in two days once the sugar has absorbed the moisture.

Items you will need
  •  Microwave-safe bowl
  •  Paper towel or bread slice
  •  Plastic wrap
  •  Airtight container


  • Small clay sugar keepers stabilize the moisture during storage so the brown sugar doesn't dry out. Bury the clay disk in the sugar and keep the lid on the container at all times to keep it moist.

About the Author

Jenny Harrington has been a freelance writer since 2006. Her published articles have appeared in various print and online publications. Previously, she owned her own business, selling handmade items online, wholesale and at crafts fairs. Harrington's specialties include small business information, crafting, decorating and gardening.

Photo Credits

  • Medioimages/Photodisc/Valueline/Getty Images