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Reading Programs for Adults With Dyslexia

by Keri Meredith

Adults with dyslexia face many challenges, including finding the support and assistance needed to improve their literacy skills. If you’re an adult who struggles with dyslexia, an array of reading programs with strategies that center on improving skills such as phonics, decoding and reading comprehension exists throughout the country. Such programs are available online, onsite or by receiving study materials at home.

Adult Dyslexia Basics

Dyslexia is a learning disorder often characterized by difficulties with spelling, decoding, reading comprehension and language expression. Adults with dyslexia have struggled with such difficulties throughout their school years but still struggle with word recognition while reading and processing verbal and written information. According to the International Dyslexia Association, adults with dyslexia need a reading program that focuses on using multisensory skills and enhancing phonemic awareness. Multisensory skills involve using the brain pathways -- auditory, visual, kinesthetic and tactile -- simultaneously for the purpose of heightening memory and learning, and phonemic awareness is the ability to work with individual sounds within words.

Gemm Learning

Through Gemm Learning, adults are engaged in a home-based supervised online dyslexia reading program. Gemm Learning utilizes Fast For Word software, consisting of a variety of brain-fitness exercises based on the research of four neuroscientists. Designed to be completed in as little as six months, this program focuses on building and strengthening cognitive skills, enhancing reading fluency and developing reading comprehension. Gemm Learning provides professional guidance and support by helping students get started with the program, monitoring activities and student progress, making program adjustments when necessary and answering any questions students may have.

Davis Dyslexia Correction

The Davis Dyslexia Correction program focuses on a visual and meaning-based approach to reading. With many onsite providers throughout the United States, it won’t be hard to find a location near you. For new students, Davis providers will perform initial assessments to determine individual dyslexic-based needs. Upon receiving assessment results, students receive one-on-one lessons that incorporate the Davis methods of orientation counseling and symbol mastery to help students become the fluent and comprehensive readers they desire to be. Students are also able to order supplementary learning materials to use at home.

Lindamood-Bell Learning Processes

Lindamood-Bell Learning Processes offer a variety of reading programs geared toward adults with dyslexia at onsite learning centers across the United States. The programs concentrate on improving students’ reading, spelling, comprehension and critical thinking skills. Students work on developing symbol imagery, which is the ability to retain letter patterns and whole words, and sensory-cognitive skills while focusing on enhancing phonemic awareness. Instructors base their one-on-one teaching techniques on cognitive learning theory with goals for students to attain the concepts of self-monitoring, self-correction and reading independence.

Additional Reading Programs

Adults with dyslexia can also participate in other reading and literacy programs located in their area. Such programs are usually offered through local libraries, churches and civic organizations. Alternatively, there are several national organizations such as the International Dyslexia Association and the National Center for Learning Disabilities that are dedicated to helping individuals and families with dyslexia receive the support they need.

About the Author

Keri Meredith has worked as an educator in inner-city schools for more than 14 years. Her certifications include educational leadership, special education, English as a Second Language and general education. She holds a Master of Education from the University of St. Thomas and a Bachelor's degree in psychology from Hampton University.

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