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How to Put Your Child's Name on Their Bookbag

by Kathryn Hatter

Once your child begins attending an organized day care or school, he might carry his books and other items in a book bag. While it’s necessary to label your child’s belongings clearly to prevent loss and confusion, proceed carefully before putting his name on a book bag. A large label with your child’s name on the outside of a book bag can provide a stranger with identifying information, enabling that person to call your child by name to gain his trust.

Examine the inside of the book bag to find a suitable location to write your child’s name. If you can find a tag that's already sewn into the bag, this might be the perfect place to write your child's name. Otherwise, find a spot near the top or on an inside pocket. Write your child’s first and last name with a permanent marker, using the name or nickname she uses at school. Permanent markers work best on fabric. If your child's book bag is vinyl or plastic, the marker might rub off.

Use an iron-on label if your child has a fabric book bag. You can make your own iron-on labels using a computer graphics program like Photoshop. To do this, you simply print out the labels on regular printer paper and then use iron-on transfer paper to create your labels. You can also order custom iron-on labels online from websites like Iron-On.com.

Stitch a fabric patch on the inside of the book bag -- and then use a fabric or permanent marker to write out your child's name on the patch. You can even stitch fabric patches onto vinyl or sturdy plastic book bags.

Show your child where you wrote her name so she knows where to look to determine that the book bag is hers. If you child cannot read yet, you might want to include a little design, like a flower or two small hearts, next to her name to help her identify her book bag.

Items you will need
  • Permanent marker

Warning

  • Teach your child not to respond if a stranger engages in conversation. Tell him that it's OK to drop a book bag and run, if necessary, advises the Women's Personal Safety Network website.

About the Author

Kathryn Hatter is a veteran home-school educator, as well as an accomplished gardener, quilter, crocheter, cook, decorator and digital graphics creator. As a regular contributor to Natural News, many of Hatter's Internet publications focus on natural health and parenting. Hatter has also had publication on home improvement websites such as Redbeacon.

Photo Credits

  • Visage/Stockbyte/Getty Images