our everyday life

Proper Storage for Brown Rice

by Tammie Painter, studioD

The U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends adults get at least half of their daily grain servings from whole grains. Brown rice is a tasty way to meet these guidelines. Unlike white rice, brown rice still has the bran and germ layer intact giving it a nutty flavor and rich texture. Because the bran layer contains oil, brown rice is more likely to go rancid than white rice. Storing your rice properly ensures it remains fresh and retains its flavor.

On the Shelf

If you only purchase a small quantity of brown rice at a time and plan to use it regularly, you can store the rice on your pantry shelf for up to six months. Keep the rice in its original package or store it in an airtight container. Your storage area should be out of bright light and kept at room temperature or cooler.

In the Refrigerator

If you have the space, your refrigerator is an excellent place to store brown rice and other whole grains. The cool temperatures and dark interior of your fridge prevent the oil in the bran layer from going rancid. You can store the rice in its original package or transfer it to an airtight container. Brown rice can keep for 12 to 16 months in the refrigerator.

In the Freezer

Buying brown rice in bulk can save you money, but many people have trouble eating all the rice before it goes bad. A freezer is the best way to keep from wasting your big bag of rice. To make using your rice more convenient, portion it out into freezer bags. In each bag place the amount you would normally cook for a meal. Once filled, squeeze as much air out of the bags as possible and lay them flat to save space. Kept in the freezer, brown rice can be stored for up to two years.

Storing Cooked Rice

You can keep leftover cooked brown rice in the refrigerator or freeze it for later. Place the rice in a storage dish and then cover it tightly. Eat the rice within five days, or store it in the freezer for up to six months. Because the cooked rice may be a bit dry after storing it, add a couple tablespoons of water or broth to each cup of rice you want to reheat.


About the Author

Based in Portland, Ore., Tammie Painter has been writing garden, fitness, science and travel articles since 2008. Her articles have appeared in magazines such as "Herb Companion" and "Northwest Travel" and she is the author of six books. Painter earned her Bachelor of Science in biology from Portland State University.

Photo Credits

  • Ryan McVay/Digital Vision/Getty Images