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Positive Affirmation Exercises for Teenagers

by Kathryn Rateliff Barr

Many teens deal with fear, poor self image and a push to excel daily, according to Dr. Thom Rainer, quoting a survey from his Church Central Associates. Positive affirmations can help build a secure self-image, see life more optimistically and focus on the steps necessary to meet goals. As each affirmation becomes fully integrated, the teen can begin a new affirmation that deals with a new concern or goal.

Write and Read

One method for working on positive affirmations is to write the affirmations down five times each day, reading them aloud as you write, according to Affirmating.com, a self-help affirmation website. Suggest to your teen to “Write your affirmation in a positive frame, such as, 'I am secure and happy in who I am. I am exactly where I need to be at this particular moment and I am moving to become what I need to be to meet my life goals.’ ” The affirmation states your teen’s goal as something that is already in process and a part of her life. Start with only one or two affirmations at a time so she can fully believe what she says.

See and Say

Looking yourself in the eye helps you believe what you say. Tell your teen, “Stand in front of the mirror and say your affirmations confidently and with a strong voice. Repeat the affirmation 10 times in a row, several times a day.” Suggest that your teens says the affirmations every time he looks in a mirror. Tell him, “Don’t read the affirmation because you can’t look yourself in the eye and read it.” Have him begin this practice once he has learned the affirmation enough to say it or paraphrase it successfully. When beginning this practice, he can start with short affirmations such as, “I am happy, healthy and capable” or “My life improves each day.”

Transforming Fears

Your teen can change her greatest fears into positive affirmations that transform her life and remove the fear. If your teen is afraid that she won’t have a grade-point average high enough to get into college, she can affirm, “I study each day and I successfully learn. I succeed academically and I have multiple offers for college.” Suggest that she determine what her greatest fear is right now, and together you will figure out how to counter it with a positive affirmation she can repeat until she sees that it is true.

Meditation and Affirmation

Meditation with affirmations can increase the effectiveness of the affirmation process. Have your teen make a 10-minute recording of his affirmations on an mp3 player. He can record the affirmations with relaxing music. Have him put the headphones on, close his eyes and listen to the recording. Tell him to repeat the affirmation with the recording, seeing it as true in his mind’s eye and feeling the same emotions he would if he knew it was true right now.

About the Author

Rev. Kathryn Rateliff Barr has taught birth, parenting, vaccinations and alternative medicine classes since 1994. She is a pastoral family counselor and has parented birth, step, adopted and foster children. She holds bachelor's degrees in English and history from Centenary College of Louisiana. Studies include midwifery, naturopathy and other alternative therapies.

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