our everyday life

Places for Dinner With Kids in Singapore

by Maria Scinto, studioD

Singapore, a city-state of slightly more than 5 million residents that ranks among the world's wealthiest nations, was named as one of the top travel destinations for 2013 by the "New York Times." It is a popular spot for environmental tourism, and plays host to some 13 million tourists annually. Many of these visitors come from neighboring Asian countries that include Indonesia, China and Malaysia, as well as from Australia and the United Kingdom. English, Malay, Chinese and Tamil are official languages, which makes it easy for tourists and natives to communicate. The hospitality industry recognizes the important role that Singapore family life plays, and many of Singapore’s restaurants welcome young diners with perks such as play areas and free meals.

Eat and Play

Seb's Bistro, located on the grounds of the historic Rochester House, is a full-service bistro located adjacent to a two-story indoor and outdoor play area called the Playhouse. The ground floor is for children up to age 7, while the top floor is for children up to age 12. The restaurant children's meals are formulated to be healthy as well as tasty, with the pasta and lasagna made with four different types of vegetables, and the shepherd’s pie is topped with a crown made of potatoes, cauliflower and leeks. The Treehouse Cafe also has a play area that features an indoor tree house. It is for children under 9, and comes equipped with arts and crafts supplies and toys. The children's menu, available for kids under 12, features several different types of pizza and pasta, as well as hot dogs, chicken nuggets and fish fingers.

Dine and Learn

The Guan Hoe Soon Restaurant has a treasure chest where kids can learn about the culture of Singapore's Peranakans, who are descended from early Chinese settlers, by digging through a treasure chest of Peranakan antiques. The restaurant serves Chinese and Singaporean dishes, and kids can enjoy fresh coconut, guava or lime drinks. The Poison Ivy Bistro offers meals made from farm-fresh fruits, veggies and herbs, and the children's menu features items such as grilled honey chicken, pineapple fish and vegetable curry. You'll have to dine early, as the bistro closes at 6:30, but you can make dinner into an educational experience by having kids take a tour of the Bollywood Food Museum.

Eat at the Beach

Coastes Singapore is a restaurant and bar serving such items as chicken wings, burgers, ribs, pizza and grilled seafood. The best part of the restaurant, as far as most kids are concerned, is its location -- right on the beach, so kids can play in the sand or swim while moms and dads unwind with a beer, glass of wine or cocktail. The Tanjong Beach Club also offers a restaurant right on the beach, or diners can choose to sit by the side of its pool where kids can splash around while their parents enjoy a meal. The kids' menu offers spaghetti, cheeseburgers and fish and chips, and beverages include lemonade, sodas and, strawberry, peach and mango ice freezes.

Kids Eat Free

The name of Brussels Sprouts refers not to the vegetable, but to the city in Belgium, and its menu features Belgian specialties such as mussels, pickled herring and a huge selection of Belgian beers. Every Saturday and Sunday, as well as on public holidays, children ten and under eat for free from the kid's menu, one child per each paying adult. Hog's Breath Cafe is an Australian steakhouse restaurant also featuring seafood, pasta and burgers. Kids eat free from the kid's menu every Sunday, one child under 12 for each adult meal ordered. There is also a play area available, with a nanny to supervise the kids while adults take advantage of the all-day happy hour.

About the Author

Maria Scinto has been writing since 2004 on sports, nutrition, health, parenting, real estate, education and other topics for publications including "Northern Virginia Magazine," "Montgomery Gazette" and "Fairfax Times." She has coauthored two books, "The Takeout Cookbook" and "Savvy Convert's Guide to Choosing a Religion." She has a master's in library and information science from the University of Denver.

Photo Credits

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