our everyday life

The Parental Role of Fathers With Daughters

by Angeliki Coconi

From the minute they are born, girls can form an opinion of men based solely on their father, shaping relationships highly affected by their own relationship with their dad. When it comes to a girl's image of a man, her father is likely to be her chief guide. He can establish what she should expect of a man and how she should handle him when she's fully grown. If a girl enjoys a meaningful and affectionate connection with her father while growing up, her development may be impacted positively.

Cognitive Development

According to The Institute for the Study of Civil Society, the more a father becomes involved in his daughter's education, the more she will develop intellectually. This is why you're encouraged to celebrate your daughter's mind, to read to her and keep an eye out for any interests or talents that she expresses an inclination towards. Attend her school's events alongside her mother and praise her achievements. If you can, financially support her hobbies and commit to your daughter's educational goals. This will greatly assist her in succeeding academically, as well as help her choose the right career path in the future.

Psychological Well-Being

Fathers should freely let their daughters form an attachment with them. Spend as much quality time with your little girl as you possibly can. Support her emotionally through words. Say, "Daddy is very proud of you" or "You have been a really helpful little girl today." Display physical affection and always speak well of and defend her mother, no matter what your relationship with her may be. Tell her you love her and pay attention to everything she says. Never neglect her and never put any woman down. You are her primary example of a man, so if you show your little girl you always treat women right, she will see other men that way.

Social Skills

As stated by The Institute for the Study of Civil Society, as a father you are able to inspire independence and confidence in your little girl more than anyone else. These qualities will allow her to develop social skills, join other kids' groups, play, interact with peers and form meaningful relationships in the future. Tell her she's beautiful, encourage good behavior and praise her when she deserves it. The more genuine your approval is, the more your girl will feel confident and secure. Never stop showing her how much you appreciate women through actions. When around her mother, make sure that you only display love and affection. Compliment her mother in your daughter's presence by saying, "You look very nice today" or "I love you very much." Set the right example by treating other women the way you would like your little girl to be treated by men. Be honest, respectful and affectionate.

Moral Values

As far as morality goes, the parental role can have a significant impact on a girl's life. As a father, you have the opportunity to morally guide your daughter with your own behavior. If she admires you and feels the need to resemble you, you may serve as her main role model. This automatically means that your own moral judgment and values will determine your daughter's development of personal morality, according to Jeffrey Rosenberg, former Communications Director at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and W. Bradford Wilcox, assistant professor of sociology at the University of Virginia. If your little girl identifies with you, she is more likely to accept blame as well as refrain from misbehaving when she interacts with her peers. She will develop self-control and learn how to respect other people's emotions. Just like you've shown her, she is likely to become honest and caring herself.

About the Author

Angeliki Coconi started writing in 1999 with the theater comedy "Loop," produced in Athens. In 2001 she wrote and produced another comedy, "Modern Cinderella." In 2006 she was awarded a Master of Science in literature from the University of Edinburgh. In 2009 Coconi obtained the Postgraduate Certificate in Screenwriting from Napier University of Edinburgh.

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Polka Dot/Getty Images