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How to Get Paid to Market a Company's Product

by Clayton Browne, studioD

Marketing is one of the hottest industries of the 21st century. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that demand for marketing research analysts will increase 41 percent by 2020. Marketing can be defined as the process by which goods and services move from concept to the customer. Marketers are those who are hired to promote and distribute these goods and services. The process of marketing includes market and product research, product design and planning, as well as executing marketing and advertising campaigns. An undergraduate degree is the general educational requirement for marketers; some senior marketing research analysts will have master's degrees.

Enroll in a college or university of your choice and complete a bachelor's degree program. Most marketers or marketing managers have a degree in advertising, market research, industrial psychology business. Typical classes include business law, management, economics, accounting, finance, mathematics, psychology, demographics and statistics.

Apply for internships or work-study programs in the area of marketing you are interested in pursuing after your sophomore year. Plum internships are tough to come by, so maintain a high GPA and participate in departmental or student life activities to show that you are of good character with a well-rounded personality.

Make an effort to develop your personal and professional networks while you are in school. Get to know your professors and fellow students, participate in departmental activities and make a point to attend as many industry expert lectures or panels as possible.

Start applying for marketing jobs several months before you graduate. Decide if you want to stay where you are or are willing to move for a good job in another city. Marketers are hired in all industries, and Internet marketing or digital marketing is a high-growth area. Communicate with those in your network to let them know you are looking for a job.


  • Consider putting up your own shingle and working as an independent marketing consultant once you get a few years of experience in the industry.

About the Author

Clayton Browne has been writing professionally since 1994. He has written and edited everything from science fiction to semiconductor patents to dissertations in linguistics, having worked for Holt, Rinehart & Winston, Steck-Vaughn and The Psychological Corp. Browne has a Master of Science in linguistic anthropology from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

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