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Overall Body Workout Routine for Teen Boys

by Robin McDaniel, studioD

A workout that exercises the whole body is an efficient way to increase strength, cardiovascular health and flexibility. Teen boys who are looking to get into shape can benefit from an overall body workout to increase their prowess in sports and improve their fitness. Whether a teen is thin, normal or overweight, they can benefit from some basic workout techniques that make up a complete body workout routine.

Warm up, Cool Down, and Stretch

Before beginning any exercise program, teens should warm up and stretch their muscles in order to reduce the risk of injury. Do ballistic stretches by swinging the arms or legs briskly, kicking lightly from side to side, or shaking a body part to loosen the muscles. Include static stretches such as reaching the arms overhead on each side one at a time and holding for a count of 10, bending forward for a toe touch, and performing basic lunges. Yoga postures are effective for stretching before working out. Perform warm-up and cool-down stretches at the beginning and end of a workout.


Education.com and the Washington state Department of Social and Health Services claim that one-quarter of adolescents are overweight, and that vigorous physical activity for 20 minutes per day three times a week is important for teen health. Teens should include at least a half hour of cardiovascular work in their routine in order to increase the heart rate and burn fat. Punching a heavy bag using varying punches such as the uppercut, cross and jab is effective. Jogging, running, plyometrics, elliptical, basketball or other sports that involve increasing the heart rate and sweating for 20 minutes or more will contribute to an effective workout.

Strength Training

Add some resistance training into a workout to help your teen increase overall musculature and strength. Teens Health recommends using resistance such as weight bands, free weights, weight-lifting machines or isometrics to get a thorough body workout. If your teen doesn't have access to weights, she can do pushups and pullups, use her body weight for resistance. Focus on technique, and add increasing weight over time in order to develop body mass. Work out with weights two to three days per week for best results.

Core Work

Working the core is important for maintaining balance and coordination. Core training makes it easier to perform physical activities, and MayoClinic.com advocates focusing on the abdominals and lower back muscles when working the core. Your teen should perform lower leg raises and basic leg crunches while lying on his back. Have him perform multiple repetitions and sets using correct form in order to begin experiencing results.

About the Author

Robin McDaniel is a writer, educator and musician. She holds a master's degree in higher educational leadership from Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton as well as a bachelor's degree in elementary education. She is pursuing a Ph.D. in adult in community education. McDaniel enjoys writing, blogging, web design, singing and playing bass guitar.

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