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How to Find Out if You Have Money Due From FHA Mortgage Insurance

by Steve Lander

When you take out a mortgage insured by the Federal Housing Administration, you make an up-front payment into its mortgage insurance fund along with your annual mortgage insurance premiums. If you pay off that loan relatively quickly, you may be eligible to get a portion of the money that you paid into the FHA's insurance fund back. Your lender is supposed to notify the Department of Housing and Urban Development of your eligibility for a refund when you pay off your loan, but lenders don't always send the notice. If you don't get a refund, your money ends up sitting with HUD and you can request your own refund.

Open a web browser on your computer and navigate to the HUD refund page.

Enter your HUD case number -- which is a nine-digit number, separated by a dash between the third and fourth digit -- in the "Case #" field, if you have a case number. Your case number might look like this: 123-456789.

Enter your name in the "Name:" field to search for a rebate. If you have a relatively uncommon last name, entering only your last name may be adequate. You can also enter your first name and middle initial to narrow down the search. If you enter a middle initial, but your loan doesn't have your initial on it, it won't come up, so you may need to experiment a bit.

Click the "Search" button to bring up the list of loans for that case number or name. If you're due a refund, you will see a record that shows your name, information about your loan, and the address to which it corresponds.

Tips

  • If you're due a refund, call HUD at the number on the search page to request it. As of October 2013, the number is 800-697-6967, but the search page will have the most current number.
  • Refunds vary based on when you took out your loan and how you paid it off. For loans originated after December 8, 2004, you're only eligible for a refund if you refinanced to a new FHA loan and you did it within three years. Older loans have more generous eligibility rules.

Warning

  • You may be contacted by companies that offer to find your refund for you -- sometimes called tracers. While they aren't doing anything illegal, they can't do anything for you that you can't do for yourself, and they will charge you a fee.

About the Author

Steve Lander has been a writer since 1996, with experience in the fields of financial services, real estate and technology. His work has appeared in trade publications such as the "Minnesota Real Estate Journal" and "Minnesota Multi-Housing Association Advocate." Lander holds a Bachelor of Arts in political science from Columbia University.

Photo Credits

  • Digital Vision./Digital Vision/Getty Images