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Occupations That Work Odd Hours

by Gina Scott

For those who do not like traditional 9-5 office jobs, careers with odd hours are an appealing choice. By definition, occupations with odd hours are those that take place on evenings or weekends, during times like the middle of the night or even across seven days a week. While working odd hours can be unpredictable and stressful, it can also suit those who are easily bored and like to be challenged. If you're looking for a job with atypical hours, there are several choices to consider.

Nursing

Home and hospital nurses can experience odd work hours. Illness and physical maladies do not follow a daytime routine -- and neither do the nurses who help patients feel better. As an example, hospital nurses have been known to work double shifts or three 12-hour shifts in a row, with more days off in between. Home nurses could work at any time of the day. For example, they may be scheduled to help an elderly client late into the evening or in the very early morning hours.

Real Estate Agent

Real estate careers allow agents flexibility in their schedules, but this can also create odd work hours because they are often working around clients who work normal 9-5 jobs. In addition, when a buyer wants to view a home, timing is critical. Pressing deadlines mean agents might have to drop what they're doing and show a home at 8:00 p.m. or on a Sunday morning. When a client's home is on the line, deadlines tend to be more demanding, and this results in unusual work hours.

Truck Driver

Because they need to get to a destination on time, truck drivers may work unusual hours. Over-the-road drivers are sometimes away from home for many nights in a row and drive during all times of the day and night. They may also be called on short notice to cover a critical delivery which lends to odd hours. Truck drivers have physical jobs where it comes in handy to have a strong constitution and the ability to be comfortable spending time alone.

Restaurant and Bar Staff

Bars and some restaurants have extended hours to serve patrons into the early hours of the morning. Accordingly, bartenders work atypical hours and their shifts often run from 6:00 p.m. to 2:00 a.m. on weekends. Because they serve many people who work normal hours, restaurants need coverage at all times of day. Servers, hosts and cooks are also needed during a restaurant's posted open hours which means they may also be called upon to work odd hours. When someone calls in sick, a restaurant staff member may be asked to pull a double, which means working two shifts back to back.

About the Author

Based in the Midwest, Gina Scott has been writing professionally since 2008. She has worked in real estate since 2004 and has expertise in pop culture and health-related topics. She has also self-published a book on how to overcome chronic health conditions. Scott holds a Master of Arts in higher-education administration from Ball State University.

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