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How to Obtain a Choctaw Indian Roll Number

by Jennifer Holik

Individuals interested in discovering whether they have Native American ancestry or those wishing to prove it to apply for a Certificate of Indian Blood must conduct a lot of research. Those interested in applying for Choctaw tribal membership must first prove they descend from a Choctaw. Those individuals must obtain a Dawes Roll number, also known as the Final Rolls of Citizens and Freedmen of the Five Civilized Tribes in Indian Territory. The National Archives holds the Dawes Rolls, which are searchable.

Identify the approximate age of your ancestor during the time period 1898 to 1906. This was the enrollment period for the Final Rolls of Citizens and Freedmen of the Five Civilized Tribes in Indian Territory. Choctaws listed on those rolls must have been living in the Indian Territory during that time period and registered.

Search the index to the Dawes Rolls (archives.gov/research/arc/native-americans-final-rolls.html). You must have the tribe and the person's name. In this case, you are looking for records on the Choctaw tribe.

View the Choctaw by Blood pages on the National Archives page. The pages are listed in alphabetical order. If you are searching for a Choctaw by the name of Evelina Amos, open the first Index for Choctaw by Blood and search through the pages of surnames beginning with A to locate Amos, Evelina. The roll number will be listed next to her name.

Search the Final Roll listing (archives.gov/research/arc/) by entering the roll number in the search box. Click "search" and then the link "The Final Rolls of Citizens and Freedmen of the Five Civilized Tribes in Indian Territory." Click the tab "digital copies" click through the listing to locate your tribe and individual. This may take several attempts scrolling through the pages.

View the final listing which states the individual's name, age, sex, blood (full or some variation of Choctaw) and census card number.

About the Author

Jennifer Holik, a professional genealogist, has been writing professionally since 2009. She writes for Chicago-area genealogy society publications. Holik has a Bachelor of Arts in history from the Missouri University of Science and Technology.

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