our everyday life

How to Have Nice Knees

by M.H. Dyer, studioD

Built for kneeling and bending, your knees take a beating day after day which can result in an unsightly, dark appearance. Neglected knees can be covered by pants or knee-length dresses, but sometimes your knees won't be camouflaged by layers of fabric. Having nice knees isn't easy, but a little time and care can bring out the best in these overlooked body parts.

Remove layers of dead skin cells with an an over-the-counter exfoliant containing salicylic acid or glycolic acid. Massage the product gently into the knees, and then rinse. Repeat once or twice every week.

Take lukewarm showers or baths, and limit your time in the water to 15 minutes or less. Excessive time in hot water strips the natural oils from the skin.

Wash your knees with a gentle, moisturizing cleanser. Avoid products containing alcohol, perfume, deodorants or other harsh, drying ingredients.

Pat your knees dry with a soft towel after bathing, leaving the skin slightly moist. Don't rub.

Massage a thick moisturizer into your knees every day. Apply the moisturizer while your skin is warm and moist following a bath or shower. If your knees are extremely dry, apply moisturizer twice each day, in the morning and at night.

Wear sunscreen to protect your knees from the harsh rays of the sun. Sun damage leads to dry, sagging skin and wrinkles. Use a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher.

Practice weightlifting or other strength-training exercises to firm and strengthen your knees.

Reduce fat, including around your knees, with aerobic exercises such as jogging, cycling, dancing or a brisk walk.

Items you will need
  •  Over-the-counter exfoliant
  •  Gentle, moisturizing cleanser
  •  Soft towel
  •  Moisturizer
  •  Sunscreen


  • Drink at least eight glasses of water every day to keep your skin hydrated.

About the Author

M.H. Dyer began her writing career as a staff writer at a community newspaper and is now a full-time commercial writer. She writes about a variety of topics, with a focus on sustainable, pesticide- and herbicide-free gardening. She is an Oregon State University Master Gardener and Master Naturalist and holds a Master of Fine Arts in creative nonfiction writing.

Photo Credits

  • Ryan McVay/Lifesize/Getty Images