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How Much Do Major League Baseball Coaches Make?

by Jeannine Mancini, studioD

In most industries, leadership positions are associated with the top salaries. When it comes to professional baseball, the opposite is true. Although coaches are responsible for leading the team to victory, salaries on average are lower than the players. Only a few top coaches earn more than the average $2.5 million salary of a professional baseball player.

General Managers

In baseball, the general manager is the equivalent of a head coach. In addition to coaching the team, the managers act as spokesmen for their franchises. They must attend meetings with the media and make statements on behalf of the team. Although general managers only have to work for about eight months out of the year, they work around 100 hours a week or more during the season.

Manager Salaries

Average salaries for general managers vary between $500,000 and $2 million annually, according to Fox News. Only a couple are known to make more. In 2013, the Yankees signed Joe Girardi to a four-year $16 million contract. Since it is easier for a team owner to replace a manager than a player, the salaries of general managers are usually far less than the salaries of the star players on the team.

Assistant Coaches

Along with the general manager, professional baseball teams usually have assistant coaches specifically for coaching certain positions. Teams have a batting coach, hitting coach, bullpen coach, first-base coach, second-base coach, third-base coach, and others. Salaries vary based on the team. In 2013, the Atlanta Braves reportedly paid pitching coach Roger McDowell $200,000. The Phillies paid their pitching coach, Rich Dubee, $360,000 for 2013.

Bonuses and Incentives

It is not uncommon for managers to negotiate performance and signing bonuses in their contracts. In 2007, Joe Girardi signed on to the Yankees and received a $300,000 bonus spread over his three-year contract. Managers can also receive bonuses based on the performance of their team. A manager who leads a team to a World Series victory is likely to earn a higher salary than the manager of a low-ranking team.

About the Author

Jeannine Mancini, a Florida native, has been writing business and personal finance articles since 2003. Her articles have been published in the Florida Today and Orlando Sentinel. She earned a Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies from the University of Central Florida.

Photo Credits

  • Donald Miralle/Digital Vision/Getty Images