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How to Make Homemade Dead-Sea Salts Shampoo

by Susan Dorling

Clocking in at a cool three million years old, the Dead Sea serves up salts that contain 21 minerals and provide a rich mélange of potent, therapeutic nutrients routinely used in a variety of commercial preparations designed to revitalize skin and hair, and to heal many physical and physiological maladies. Research has shown that this extraordinary salt may also help to improve circulation and stimulate hair regrowth, relieve itchy scalp and even help treat psoriasis. For hair and scalp problems -- or simply to replenish the natural luster and volume of your locks -- avoid the chemical cocktail of commercial shampoos and make a simple shampoo from Dead Sea salts and essential oils at home.

Purchase Essential Oils

Purchase the following essential oils for healthy, normal hair: lavender, lemon, eucalyptus, parsley, geranium or rosemary. If your hair is healthy or normal, is not dry or greasy and is easy to manage and always shining, you will add two to four drops of lavender oil, lemon oil, eucalyptus oil, parsley oil, geranium oil or rosemary oil to every 4 ounces of shampoo base.

Purchase sandalwood essential oil or carrot essential oil for dry hair. If your hair is dry, damaged, tangled, or has split ends, you will add two drops of sandalwood oil or five drops of carrot oil to 1 cup of the soap base.

Purchase lavender essential oil or rosemary essential oil for oily hair. You will add three drops of lavender oil and four drops of rosemary oil to 4 ounces of the soap base.

Soap-Flakes Shampoo Base

Simmer 1 quart of distilled water in the saucepan. Add 4 ounces of soap flakes and stir until the soap dissolves.

Cool the soap mixture completely, then add your choice of essential oils for your hair type and blend thoroughly.

Pour the mixture into the jar. Let cool completely, then store in a dark place.

Add 1 tablespoon of Dead Sea salts to this mixture before use. Shake the jar until the mixture is blended, then apply to wet hair.

If the mixture becomes gel-like or lumpy, beat it with the hand blender to smooth.

Castile-Soap Base

Bring 1 quart of distilled water to a simmer in the saucepan and add 4 ounces of grated castile soap.

Boil the soap mixture until all the soap has dissolved. Add your choice of essential oils for your hair type and blend well.

Pour the shampoo into the jar. Let cool completely, then store in a dark place.

Add 1 tablespoon of Dead Sea salts to this mixture before use. Shake the jar until the mixture is blended, then apply to wet hair.

Soapwort-Root Shampoo

Break 1/2 ounce of soapwort root into small pieces, then place the pieces into the bowl and crush with the metal spoon.

Boil 2 pints of distilled water in the saucepan and pour over the soapwort-root mixture.

Leave the soapwort root and water to infuse for at least one hour, then filter the mixture through the coffee filter into the jar.

Add your choice of essential oils for your hair type and blend well. Let the mixture cool completely.

Add 1 tablespoon of Dead Sea salts to this mixture before use. Shake the jar until the mixture is blended, then apply to wet hair.

Items you will need
  • 4 ounces of any brand of soap flakes, or 4 ounces castile soap, or 1/2 ounce soapwort root
  • 1 tablespoon of Dead Sea salts
  • 1 quart of distilled water (or 2 pints for soapwort root base)
  • Saucepan
  • Wooden spoon
  • Hand blender
  • Mason jars or other shampoo containers
  • Bowl
  • Grater
  • Metal tablespoon
  • Coffee filter
  • Essential oils

Tips

  • Follow your shampoo with a rinse made with two drops of your preferred essential oil per 1 tablespoon of apple-cider vinegar.
  • Soap flakes are pure soap in a flake form made from a 100-percent vegetable base of palm and coconut oils. Biodegradable and never tested on animals, a variety of brands are available online, in laundry stores and in many supermarkets, or you can grate your own bar soap of choice.

Warning

  • Consult with your physician before using any new treatment on your skin or hair.

Photo Credits

  • Photos.com/Photos.com/Getty Images