our everyday life

How to Make Homemade Cream From Milk in Your Grocery Store

by Dan Ketchum, studioD

If your cream goes sour or your just plain forget to pick up a carton, you can easily whip up a homemade cream substitute with store-bought milk and a little butter. Like off-the-shelf cream, this homemade version adds a smooth and rich texture to dishes ranging from quiche to scrambled eggs. No matter what you're whipping up, stick with whole milk rather than 1- or 2-percent varieties to lend your homemade concoction a richer taste and creamier consistency.

Melt the butter or margarine over medium heat in a saucepan. Allow the butter to cool. Use 1/3 cup of butter for every 3/4 cup of milk.

Add your milk to the mixing bowl and slowly pour the cooled, liquefied butter into the milk.

Whisk the milk and butter together until they're fully blended and feature a smooth, creamy consistency. Use this homemade cream as a substitute for store-bought cream at a one-to-one ratio.

Items you will need
  •  Butter or margarine
  •  Saucepan
  •  Mixing bowl
  •  Whisk


  • You can chill your homemade cream before using it, just as you would store-bought cream. If separation occurs, re-mix the milk and butter with a whisk or hand mixer before use.
  • To make dairy-free homemade cream, use soy or rice milk and dairy-free margarine or extra light olive oil. You can also simply allow a can of full-fat coconut milk to settle and skim off the cream that rises to the top.
  • To infuse your homemade cream -- or even just regular whole milk -- with additional flavor, mix in a flavoring ingredient and bring the liquid to a simmer, then immediately allow the cream to cool and strain out any remaining solids. Cinnamon sticks, whole coffee beans, cloves and cardamom pods make great flavoring ingredients.

About the Author

Dan Ketchum has been a professional writer since 2003, with work appearing online and offline in Word Riot, Bazooka Magazine, Anemone Sidecar, Trails and more. Dan's diverse professional background spans from costume design and screenwriting to mixology, manual labor and video game industry publicity.

Photo Credits

  • Ryan McVay/Photodisc/Getty Images