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How to Make a Black Pepper Crust on a Sirloin Tip Roast

by M.H. Dyer, studioD

Roasting the meat with a black pepper crust turns a sirloin tip roast into a tasty, succulent feast by sealing in moisture and creating a pungent, spicy crispness. While the sirloin is one of the most tender cuts of beef, the sirloin tip roast, which is near the heavily muscled rump section, is rich in flavor but tends to be slightly less tender. Combine black pepper with milder white pepper to tone down the peppery flavor. Fresher pepper provides the best flavor.

Stir salt and freshly ground black pepper together with olive oil to make a paste, adding fresh or dried herbs such as rosemary and thyme to taste. You can also blend black peppercorns and kosher salt or sea salt in a blender or food processor.

Rub the paste evenly over all sides of the roast, then cover the roast loosely with aluminum foil. Place it in the refrigerator for 12 to 24 hours, which allows the seasonings to penetrate deep into the meat. If you're short on time, let the seasoned roast sit at room temperature for 30 to 40 minutes.

Place the roast on a rack in a shallow roasting pan, then place the roast, uncovered, in an oven preheated to 450 degrees Fahrenheit. Do not add liquid.

Roast the meat for 30 minutes, then baste it with pan juices. Return the roast to the oven and cook it until a thermometer inserted into the center of the roast registers 140 F, which is medium-rare. Cooking time for a medium-rare, 2- to 4-pound roast is approximately 1 3/4 to 2 hours; and 2 1/4 to 2 1/2 hours for a 4- to 6-pound roast. Increase the internal temperature to 155 F for a roast cooked to medium.

Transfer the roast to a serving plate or cutting board. Cover the meat loosely with aluminum foil, then let it rest for 20 to 30 minutes before carving. The temperature continues to rise to a safe level during the resting time. Additionally, the juices settle into the meat, making the roast juicy and easy to carve.

Items you will need
  •  Freshly ground black pepper
  •  Salt
  •  Olive oil
  •  Fresh or dried rosemary and thyme (optional)
  •  Aluminum foil
  •  Shallow roasting pan with rack

About the Author

M.H. Dyer began her writing career as a staff writer at a community newspaper and is now a full-time commercial writer. She writes about a variety of topics, with a focus on sustainable, pesticide- and herbicide-free gardening. She is an Oregon State University Master Gardener and Master Naturalist and holds a Master of Fine Arts in creative nonfiction writing.

Photo Credits

  • Medioimages/Photodisc/Photodisc/Getty Images