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Low-Fat Breakfast Smoothies

by Michelle Powell-Smith, studioD

Smoothies are a quick, healthy breakfast option for the whole family. Making a low-fat smoothie takes only minutes; and if you choose mild, sweet flavors, even young children will enjoy this nutritious treat. A well-made smoothie contains an array of vitamins and antioxidants from fruit, protein and calcium for a breakfast that will fuel a busy morning at work or school.


Smoothie flavors can range from basics, like strawberry and banana, to tropical flavors, such as mango and pineapple. Take advantage of seasonal fruits when they're at their best and most affordable or freeze your favorites. You'll even find packaged smoothie blends in the freezer section to speed up smoothie prep time. Keep in mind that kids who are picky about textures may not be fans of seedy berries, like blackberries or raspberries, in their smoothies.

Power Up

While the simplest smoothies are just fruit or fruit and fruit juice, adding protein can provide the staying power you and the kids need. Non-fat Greek yogurt, silken tofu or protein powder are all fat-free or low-fat options to add protein to your smoothies. Greek yogurt and tofu provide a smooth creamy texture. Protein powders add significant amounts of protein but may be gritty or have an unpleasant taste.

Boost Nutrition

If you need to sneak more veggies into picky kids, adding greens to a low-fat smoothie is one option. Surprisingly, you can't taste kale or spinach when blended into a blueberry or mango smoothie. Unfortunately, you can see them. Try renaming your smoothies with playful or playfully gross names to make their green color appeal to the kids.


You'll need liquid to blend your smoothie together. Options include milk, soy or almond milk, or fruit juice. Kids may find the flavor of milk or vanilla soy milk more appealing than the tang of orange juice. If your fruit blend isn't too sweet, try a sweeter juice, like pear or apple, in place of milk or orange juice. You can also add ice to chill your smoothie and give it a thicker texture.

About the Author

With a master's degree in art history from the University of Missouri-Columbia, Michelle Powell-Smith has been writing professionally for more than a decade. An avid knitter and mother of four, she has written extensively on a wide variety of subjects, including education, test preparation, parenting, crafts and fashion.

Photo Credits

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