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Light Calorie Vegetarian Breakfast

by Michelle Powell-Smith

Vegetarian and vegan meals, including breakfast, aren't always low in calories or fat. Starting your day off with a nutritious and well-rounded breakfast can keep your energy up until lunch and help you maintain a healthy weight. Skip the high-calorie muffin or pastry in favor of these easy and delicious vegan breakfasts for the whole family.

Hot Cereal

Oatmeal, brown rice cereal or quinoa cereal can start your day with a high-fiber meal. Cook hot cereal with soy milk, almond milk or rice milk in the slow cooker overnight to make your morning easier. Dress up your oatmeal with fresh fruit and a small sprinkle of nuts to add extra protein and healthy fats without too many calories.

Tofu Scrambles

Pack in the protein with a tofu scramble for breakfast. Cook vegetables, like mushrooms, greens, peppers or onions in a skillet. Use nonstick cooking spray in place of oil to keep the calories low. Crumble firm tofu with a pinch of turmeric and a sprinkle of nutritional yeast, then warm through with vegetables. If your family is vegetarian, not vegan, flavor the tofu with a ranch-seasoning mix. Spice it up if the kids enjoy a south-of-the-border flavor. Eat your scramble as-is or use it to top a mini-bagel or a slice of whole grain toast.

Cold Cereal

Cold cereal with soy milk or another alternative milk and fruit is an easy and healthy choice. Choose a high-fiber cereal or one with added protein. Cereal is not only a light vegetarian breakfast, but also a good source of iron and vitamin B12. Watch your portion sizes, aiming for around 300 to 400 calories for a light breakfast.

Peanut Butter

Surprisingly, peanut butter can fit into a low-calorie vegetarian breakfast. Top a whole grain frozen waffle or piece of whole grain toast with 1 tbsp. to 2 tbsp. of peanut or almond butter and fresh fruit. If peanuts are a problem in your family, substitute sunflower or soy butter. The protein and fats will keep you full, while staying under 400 calories.

About the Author

With a master's degree in art history from the University of Missouri-Columbia, Michelle Powell-Smith has been writing professionally for more than a decade. An avid knitter and mother of four, she has written extensively on a wide variety of subjects, including education, test preparation, parenting, crafts and fashion.

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