Letter Ideas for a Class Reunion

by Jennifer Eblin

Sending out invitations is the key to a successful class reunion. Without invitations, guests don’t know important reunion details, including when to arrive and the events offered. Sending a letter is a good option because it requires you to be precise and clear about the reunion. Letters publicizing a class reunion help you achieve a good turnout and bring together a wide range of classmates.

Online Invitations

For a modern twist on reunion letters, send out an online invitation. Keep in mind that this type of letter only works if you have up-to-date e-mail addresses and contact information for everyone on the guest list. Do not expect others to spread the word because someone is bound to be left out. Write a basic letter that includes the date of the class reunion, the time, the location and any other pertinent information. If you’re planning any special events, such as a bus tour or picnic outside, then include those details as well. Attach the letter as a document and forward the e-mail to everyone in your class.

Scroll Invitations

A scroll invitation has an old-fashioned look that almost resembles a treasure map. Dip sheets of white paper into a diluted tea mixture. For a darker look, steep tea bags in water, using the ratio stipulated on the packaging, and soak the paper. The tea colors the paper, giving it a darker and stained look. Dry the sheets on a flat surface or hang them and let them air dry. Once the paper dries, print the class reunion information on the front, either by hand or with a computer. Depending on the budget for the reunion, you may want to roll the letters and tie with a ribbon before sending.

Traditional Invitations

A traditional class reunion letter should include not only the basic information, but an address to respond to the invitation. An address is even more important if guests need to pay up front for a reunion dinner or you need a head count for a specific event. Make sure you include a date by which the guests must respond to the letter.

Wording

Word the letters simply, starting with the invitation itself. The very first line of the letter should include the class name, such as “Class of 89,” or the reunion number, like “Our 15th Class Reunion.” After announcing the reunion, list the date, time and location of the event. List any other information at the bottom of the letter and finish by thanking classmates for responding.

About the Author

Jennifer Eblin has been a full-time freelance writer since 2006. Her work has appeared on several websites, including Tool Box Tales and Zonder. Eblin received a master's degree in historic preservation from the Savannah College of Art and Design.