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How to Leave My Alcoholic Husband

by Katya Gordeeva

If your husband is an alcoholic, he's one of almost 17.6 million adults in the United States who have alcohol problems, according to MedlinePlus. Alcoholism can be recognized by its symptoms, which include: always craving alcohol; the inability to stop drinking, once started; physical dependence; and high alcohol tolerance. An alcoholic husband can create serious problems for his wife, such as domestic violence, unemployment and poverty. However, you don't have to stay in an intolerable home situation. With courage and support, you can leave your alcoholic husband.

Accept the fact that you can't force your husband to stop drinking. Your love and care for him, no matter how great, isn't enough to break his addiction. He will only get better if he chooses to, according to HelpGuide.

Compare the benefits -- and costs -- of staying in your marriage. Some things to think about are how this decision will affect other people, and what your life will be like, five years after leaving your husband.

Talk to your husband about your decision when he's sober. Explain to him how his alcoholism is hurting you, and that you need to leave him. Pick out a few examples of the times his alcoholism affected you. Have this conversation with him in a quiet, but public place, such as a park. However, if you have any reason to fear that he might react violently, simply leave him a note. Your own safety must always be your first priority.

Pack all of your belongings, and move out of your house. If you're unable to afford an apartment, stay with a relative, or at a women's shelter, until you're able to get back on your feet. Don't tell your husband where you'll be staying, to prevent him from following you. This is especially important if you've been a victim of domestic violence.

Cut off all contact with your husband. Be sure to quickly change your cell phone number and email address. It will be more difficult to move on with your life, if you continue to talk to him.

About the Author

Katya Gordeeva began writing professionally in 2009. She has had several news and feature articles published in "The Chronicle," "Northwest Indiana Times" and "Gary 411" newspapers. Gordeeva is pursuing a Bachelor of Arts in public relations from Purdue University Calumet.

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