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How to Get Your Kids to Stop Leaving the Toilet Seat Up

by Nadia Haris

Leaving the toilet seat up is an annoying bathroom habit. But when your kids do this, make it a teachable moment. Include proper toilet etiquette when you are toilet teaching your toddler. It is important to continue the hygiene training for young children who are often in a rush to get back to their playtime.

Implement bathroom hygiene rules as part of your household rules. Emphasize that your child must put down the toilet seat and wipe it before flushing the toilet. Then he must wash his hands with soap. Explain that it is important to do these things in this order to keep his hands germ-free.

Post a sign above the toilet to remind your child to put down the toilet seat. Draw a picture to illustrate this and get the message across effectively. Young children may not understand a written sign.

Reward your child for remembering to put down the toilet seat. This can be saying thank you and giving him a hug to show your appreciation. Or include it in his weekly points for doing his chores around the house.

Teach toddlers and young boys to sit down instead of standing up to pee. This prevents them from putting up the toilet seat in the first place. It is also easier for boys to pee sitting down and prevents urine splashes on the seat or the floor.

Explain to your child that it is cleaner to flush the toilet with the lid down. This forces him to put down the seat and close the lid. The health site Prevention notes that flushing with the lid up can send water droplets that may be contaminated with bacteria up to 10 inches into the air.

Tips

  • If your toddler does not put the seat down, have him use his own kid potty. Explain that using the "big kid potty" requires following the rules.
  • Alternatively, place a child's seat over the regular toilet to prevent toddlers and small children from lifting the seat.

Warning

  • Toddlers and some younger kids may be scared of getting their hand caught when putting the toilet seat down. Assist toddlers and smaller children in the bathroom and help them put the seat down and correctly wash their hands after using the toilet.

About the Author

Nadia Haris is a registered radiation therapist who has been writing about nutrition for more than six years. She is completing her Master of Science in nutrition with a focus on the dietary needs of oncology patients.

Photo Credits

  • Ryan McVay/Photodisc/Getty Images