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How to Keep Kids from Opening Sliding Closet Doors

by Susan Revermann, studioD

Closets are great places for clothing and storage, but you don’t necessarily want them to become play areas for your kids. If you want to prevent your little rascals from opening your sliding closet doors when you’re not looking, you have a few locking options to choose from. A simple door lock can make a big difference when it comes to keeping your closet intact and kid-free.

Attach an adhesive-mounted sliding door lock on the closet door. Read the product’s instructions and warnings thoroughly before beginning. The basic installation instructions explain to pull the adhesive sticker backing off of the sliding door lock and firmly press it on the inner closet door to get it to stick. The lock should be placed on the front, inside edge of the door at a level that is out of your child’s reach. You can gain access to the inside of the closet by depressing the wings of the door lock while opening the door.

Install two sliding bolt locks on the two top corners of the closet doors. These are often found positioned horizontally on regular room doors but can be positioned vertically to prevent your kids from opening the closet without your consent. These locks are attached to the door with the help of a drill, screwdriver, screws and a level. If your kids are sneaky, choose a sliding bolt that also requires a combination to be opened.

Use a hook-and-eye lock on both top corners of the sliding closet door, as a third option. Drill a small pilot hole for each hook and each eye, insert a hollow door anchor into these holes for more screw support and then screw the end of the hook and the eye parts of the lock into the anchors. When installed properly, you should be able to unlock it with ease simply by lifting the hook from the eye portion and lock it by reinserting the hook.

Items you will need
  •  1 Adhesive-mounted sliding door lock
  •  2 Sliding bolt lock kits
  •  2 Hook-and-eye locks
  •  Drywall anchors
  •  Drill

About the Author

Susan Revermann is a professional writer with educational and professional experience in psychology, research and teaching. She holds a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Washington in psychology, focused on research, motivational behavior and statistics. Revermann also has a background in art, crafts, green living, outdoor activities and overall fitness, balance and well-being.

Photo Credits

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