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How to Keep Cats Out of Baby Cribs

by Renee Cooper, studioD
While you're trying to make your baby's new crib inviting for her, you may want to make it equally univiting for your cat.

While you're trying to make your baby's new crib inviting for her, you may want to make it equally univiting for your cat.

It won't take long after you set up your baby's crib before your feline friend discovers it's a cozy little spot for his afternoon nap. Kitty could disturb your baby and bring dander, litter and hair into a space that you're trying to keep clean. And, although unlikely, it's possible that he could get a little too close to her tiny nose and mouth, hindering her breathing. For these reasons, it's a good idea to teach Kitty that he's not welcome in your baby's crib.

Set Up Furniture Early

The best time to teach your cat that he's unwelcome in your baby's crib is before your baby arrives. That way, you won't have to shoo him away while your baby is trying to nap. Cats generally don't like change and may not be happy when several new pieces of furniture come into the house. The ASPCA recommends setting up the furniture as soon as you can to allow your cat several weeks to check everything out. This way, he can see there's nothing scary about it.

Teach Kitty to Stay Away

At least a month before your baby's due date, the ASPCA recommends, make your baby's crib, changing table and any other areas you don't want your cat napping in uninviting. Cut a sheet of cardboard to fit the surfaces and cover one side with double-sided tape. Most cats don't like sticky surfaces and will quickly realize this isn't a good spot. You can also try to cover the mattress with aluminum foil or place a carpet runner, with the pointed side up, in the crib.

Close the Door

If you have taken steps to make the crib uninviting but your cat comes back as soon as you remove the deterrents, close the nursery door when your baby is asleep and keep an eye on her with a baby monitor. Or, install a temporary screen door so that you can still see and hear your baby, but your cat can't get in the room.

Use a Crib Tent

Another option to keep Kitty out of your baby's bed is to purchase a crib tent. Crib tents are made of mosquito-type netting and cover the entire top of your baby's crib so that your cat can't get inside. Before purchasing a crib tent, though, check to make sure it wasn't recalled. According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, thousands of crib tents have been recalled due to safety risks. You can check the manufacturer's website for a recall or visit www.cpsc.gov.

About the Author

Renee Cooper has been a professional writer since 2001. She spent more than 10 years as a newspaper reporter in Virginia, winning Virginia Press Association Awards in 2007, 2009 and 2010. Cooper holds a Bachelor of Science in English from Radford University.

Photo Credits

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