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How to Keep Breaded Pork Chops Crispy After Frying

by Shailynn Krow, studioD

Breading adds a layer of crunch and flavor to your pork chops, while keeping the delicate meat moist. Keeping the breading hot and crispy is a priority -- especially if they must sit a bit while you fry additional chops or your guests are slow coming to the table. The easiest way to prevent your chops from turning into a soggy mess is to hold them in the oven until they're ready to serve.

Preheat your oven to 250 degrees Fahrenheit. Set a cooling rack over a baking sheet or roll small logs of aluminum foil and set them a few inches apart on your baking sheet. The elevation keeps the pork chops from sitting on the pan's surface and steaming, which can cause your breading to turn soggy. Put the baking sheet in the center of the oven on the middle rack.

Prepare and pan-fry your pork chops. Remove the pork chops from the pan and set them on a paper-towel-lined plate. Pat the tops, bottoms and sides with a paper towel to remove any excess oil from the breading. Don't leave your pork chops on the paper towel -- they might stick, and your breading could tear off.

Move the pork chops to your cooling rack and baking sheet in the oven and continue cooking the remaining pork chops. The oven will keep your breading and pork chops crispy for up to 30 minutes after you fry them.

Items you will need
  •  Baking sheet
  •  Cooling rack or aluminum foil
  •  Paper towel-lined plate


  • Don't leave your pork chops in the oven longer than 30 minutes; they will continue to cook and eventually dry out.
  • Don't use a temperature higher than 250 degrees Fahrenheit, which also causes the pork chops to cook faster and dry out quickly.

About the Author

Shailynn Krow began writing professionally in 2002. She has contributed articles on food, weddings, travel, human resources/management and parenting to numerous online and offline publications. Krow holds a Bachelor of Science in psychology from the University of California, Los Angeles and an Associate of Science in pastry arts from the International Culinary Institute of America.

Photo Credits

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