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How to Juice Beet Stalks

by Sarah Bourque

Juicing beet stalks is a quick method of preparing an underused portion of the nutrient-rich vegetable. They bear a close likeness to rhubarb and have a sweet, earthy taste similar to chard. You can juice beet stalks along with the roots and leaves, or on their own. Mix the beet stem juice with other vegetable and fruit juices for an invigorating beverage, or add the beet stalk juice to soups or sauces for a nutrition boost.

Clean the beet stalks thoroughly under cold, running water, scrubbing off any sand or dirt with your fingers. Rub with paper towels to remove any remaining dirt.

Place the beet stalks on a cutting board. Trim off any parts that are bruised or damaged. Cut the stalks into smaller pieces if you feel it's necessary, although most juicers are powerful enough to handle whole stalks.

Prepare your juicer for juicing. Line the pulp collector with a plastic shopping or produce bag, if desired, for easier cleanup. Place a cup or small pitcher underneath the juice spout.

Turn on the juicer. Place the beet stems into the juice hopper. Use the pusher to force the stalks through, if needed.

Store any juice that you are not using immediately in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

Items you will need
  • Beet stalks, cut about 1/2 inch from the beet root, keeping leaves intact if desired
  • Paper towels
  • Cutting board
  • Knife
  • Juicer
  • Cup or small pitcher

Tips

  • Juice your beet stalks while they are still fresh. Beet stalks and leaves should be refrigerated upon purchase or harvest and used within a few days.
  • Look for beets that have bright green, leafy tops. The stems should be crisp, and the leaves should not look wilted or feel slimy.
  • Try combining your beet stalk juice with other juices like beet root, apple or carrot.

Warning

  • Some people experience side effects from drinking too much beet juice, including swelling of the throat and esophagus, chills or upset stomach. When drinking beet juice for the first time, stick to small quantities or mix with other juices.

About the Author

Sarah Bourque has been a freelance writer since 2006 and is based in the Pacific Northwest. She writes and edits for the local publisher, Pacific Crest Imprint and has written for several online content sites. Her work recently appeared in "The Goldendale Tourism and Economic Development Magazine" and "Sail the Gorge!" magazine. She attended Portland Community College where she studied psychology.

Photo Credits

  • Brand X Pictures/Brand X Pictures/Getty Images