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How to Invite Teens to Sunday School

by Kathryn Rateliff Barr

The teen years are the most spiritually active time in an individual’s life, according to the Barna Group, a research organization following the spiritual and faith practices in the United States. Teens looking for spiritual answers or connections with other spiritually interested teens could find that Sunday school fits that niche. To help teens explore this possibility, you can invite them to Sunday school or help your teen invite her friends to join her at Sunday school. Your invitation could help a teen find a home in the Church and make the decision to invite God to take an active role in her life.

Check out what the teen Sunday school at your church has to offer. You want to have accurate answers when a teen asks you about the Sunday school class. Find out what types of activities occur there, who attends, who leads the class and whether a visiting teens needs to bring a Bible to class. You can ask the teen Sunday school teacher these questions or get information from teens who attend the class.

Make a flyer with the time, location and teacher information for the class. You might include a map to the church and information on where the class is once a teen arrives at the church. Include information you received from the teens or teacher, such as dress code, need for a Bible and the types of activities a teen can expect. With permission, include a picture or two of the teens in the class. You can also promise to provide a Sunday morning snack or other welcoming gesture for teens who attend.

Target the teens you want to invite, such as your own teen's friends, teens in your neighborhood or teens in a group or classroom. Enlist your teen’s support in extending the invitation if you have a teen in the class. The invitation could get a better response coming from a teen than from an adult.

Hand out your flyer to the teens on your list, making face-to-face invitations, or have your teen do it. Answer questions the teens have and promise to get answers for questions to which you don’t have answers. Offer transportation to teens who don’t have a way to get to church. Get commitments from the teens and promise to be there -- or have your teen promise to be there -- when they arrive. Thank the teens for accepting your invitation.

Text or call the teens on the Saturday before their promised attendance date. Establish a place where you can meet the teens to make sure there is no problem in finding the classroom. Review any important information such as start time and the church address. Tell the teens, “I’ll see you there tomorrow.”

Items you will need
  • Flyer

About the Author

Rev. Kathryn Rateliff Barr has taught birth, parenting, vaccinations and alternative medicine classes since 1994. She is a pastoral family counselor and has parented birth, step, adopted and foster children. She holds bachelor's degrees in English and history from Centenary College of Louisiana. Studies include midwifery, naturopathy and other alternative therapies.

Photo Credits

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