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Ideas for Kids' Christmas Party Treat Bags

by Rosenya Faith, studioD

After all of the planning and preparation you've invested in your youngster's Christmas party, you will want to redefine the treat bag to make your parting gifts memorable. If you've handed out your fair share of bouncy balls, spinning tops and plastic bracelets, forgo the ordinary treat bags this time and surprise your young partygoers with some special, Christmas-themed tokens -- that won’t be broken before the kids make it through their front doors.


Surprise your young partygoers with brand new decorations to adorn their Christmas trees. You can pick up inexpensive ornaments at a local discount store or look for ornaments personalized with the names of each child. To help the kids remember the special event, pick up some empty photo ornaments and take pictures of each child or groups of kids at the party with a digital camera. Print off the pictures and slide one into each ornament. Alternatively, you can make the ornaments from scratch from salt dough or pick up paintable ornaments and then let the kids paint them at the party. Other inexpensive ornaments you can make or have the kids make for their treat bags are wooden craft stick snowflakes, painted white and decorated with sparkles, or polystyrene balls, decorated with candies or marshmallows.


Give the kids some goodies to enjoy after the party is over by filling the treat bags with homemade, tasty treats. You can make a Christmas-themed bouquet of cookies from sugar cookies cut in candy cane, reindeer, Santa and snowflake shapes. Slide a wooden dowel in each one before baking, decorate them with icing and wrap the cookies in cellophane wrap before tying them together in a bouquet. Alternatively, pick up small, clear jars and fill them with red, green and white candies, or pick up Christmas-themed candy molds and make the candies yourself from chocolate and candy melts. Turn candy canes into reindeer to put in the kids' goody bags by adding a pair of chenille stick antlers and a red pompom nose, or send the kids home with their own edible snowmen, made from three large marshmallows on short wooden skewers and decorated with licorice string scarves, candy-coated chocolate buttons and noses and icing dot eyes.

Santa Letters

Help the youngsters at your party make sure they get their wish lists to Santa this year by surprising them with a treat bag full of letter-writing supplies. You can start with a few pieces of holiday-themed paper; roll them up like a scroll around pencils, pencil crayons or markers and secure the scroll with red and green ribbon. Add a decorative Christmas-themed envelope to the bag, as well as Christmas stickers and foam shapes. Instead of giving the youngsters the treat bags at the end of the party, hand them out early on and use the letter writing as an activity at the party. When the kids are finished, slip the completed letters back into the treat bags for the kids to take home and send off to Santa.

Winter Gear

All of the kids at your party will be ready for the cold this year with a brand new hat and pair of mitts in their treat bags. Instead of an ordinary set of winter gear, pick up a solid-colored set for each child and embroider the child’s name into each one. Alternatively, pick up some fabric decoration supplies, such as fabric paints and markers, fabric glue, glitter, glue-on gemstones and glue-on Christmas-themed patches. Have each child decorate her hat and mitts any way she would like, let the glue dry and then slip the personalized winter gear into the goody bags. If your partygoers are a little older, pick up a big sheet of fleece fabric and cut it into long rectangles to make scarves for each child. Have the kids cut a fringe into each end of the scarves, tie knots in the fringe, and then decorate the scarves with the fabric paints, markers and decorative adornments.

About the Author

Rosenya Faith has been working with children since the age of 16 as a swimming instructor and dance instructor. For more than 14 years she has worked as a recreation and skill development leader, an early childhood educator and a teaching assistant, working in elementary schools and with special needs children between 4 and 11 years of age.

Photo Credits

  • Goodshoot/Goodshoot/Getty Images