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Ideas for Invitations to a Flip Flop Tween Birthday Party

by Rosenya Faith

Whether you're hosting a summer birthday cookout for your tween or a party by the pool, you can set the tone of your tween's flip-flop birthday party by surprising her guests with invitations that give them a sneak peek of what's to come. Skip the invitations on store shelves and opt for something a little more imaginative -- an invitation your teen can personalize with a little creativity.

Choose to Send Shoes

Let your invitees know exactly what your party is all about by using flip-flops for the invitations. You can send just one to each potential guest with the details written on the top of the shoe. Make each shoe a little more festive with colorful sequins, ribbons and bows. Alternatively, send each guest on your list a pair of flip-flops. Write the party details on the bottom of the shoes instead so the kids can wear the flip-flops to the party. Skip the embellishments so your party guests can decorate them later, but add a little birthday flair by attaching a balloon to each pair.

Paper Flip-Flops

Encourage your tween to use his creative side to help you create and decorate colorful paper flip-flop invitations. You can cut out oversized flip-flop shapes from card stock or poster board and add a thin card stock strip to make the strap. Write the party details all over the paper shoe and have your tween decorate each one any way he would like. Alternatively, cut out a smaller flip-flop shape or several miniature flip-flops to glue onto a colored poster board card and decorate each one. Write the details inside and slip the card in an envelope to drop in the mail. If you’re in a hurry, use a flip-flop shaped stamp to cover the entire card instead. Just stamp the cover, write the details inside and the invitation is done.

Tasty Toe Wear

If each of your tween’s guests has a sweet tooth, satisfy that need for goodies with an edible birthday party invitation. You can whip up a batch of sugar cookies, roll it out and cut it up with flip-flop-shaped cookie cutters. If you don’t have large flip-flop cookie cutters, draw a large template on a piece of cardboard, place it on the dough and use a knife to cut out the shape. When the cookies have baked and cooled, use royal icing or edible icing markers to write the party details on each one. Have your tween embellish the flip-flop cookies with licorice strings, candy-coated chocolates, colored sugars and edible gemstone candies.

Flip-Flop Bouquet

Whether you send real shoes, edible shoes or paper shoes, use a whole bunch and arrange them into a colorful bouquet for a special hand delivery. Start with a small flower pot, vase or pail and fill the bottom with floral foam. Include a few party details on each of the flip-flops -- use royal icing to write when you're making a flip-flop cookie bouquet -- and then attach the shoes to wooden dowels with strong glue. To make sure your invitees can enjoy the cookies, wrap them in cellophane wrap before you glue. Stick the dowels into the floral foam and your one-of-a-kind invite is ready to go.

Keep Your Guests Guessing

If you don’t want to give away the theme of the party right away, create a little mystery by turning the invitations into a guessing game. Start with a plastic beach pail since flip-flops are popular foot apparel for the beach. Write the party details all over the outside of the pail with permanent marker and fill the pail with some decorative embellishments, such as ribbon, beads, sequins, pompoms and satin bows. Include a note with the adornments, saying, "Can you guess what w'ell be doing at my birthday party?" Be sure to ask guests to bring their bucket of goodies along with them to the birthday to decorate their flip-flops at the party.

References

  • FamilyFun's Parties: 100 Party Plans for Birthdays, Holidays & Every Day; Deanna F. Cook
  • Birthday Party On A Budget!; KMS Publishing

About the Author

Rosenya Faith has been working with children since the age of 16 as a swimming instructor and dance instructor. For more than 14 years she has worked as a recreation and skill development leader, an early childhood educator and a teaching assistant, working in elementary schools and with special needs children between 4 and 11 years of age.

Photo Credits

  • Comstock/Comstock/Getty Images