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Ideas for Asking a Girl to Marry You

by Zora Hughes, studioD

The number of ways in which you can propose to the woman you want to spend the rest of your life with are practically infinite, and there is no "right way." However, you can go wrong if you don't consider what she would be most comfortable with. Some women want the whole world to witness their proposal, while others would prefer it just be the two of you. She might want something simple and traditional or super creative and unique. Determine the best way to propose to your girlfriend based on her personality, her interests and your budget.

Classy and Traditional

If your lady is a fan of tradition, you can't go wrong with a classic type of proposal. Take her to dinner at a beautiful restaurant with a view, get down on one knee and pop the question. Variations of this classic proposal include having your waiter put the ring in a champagne glass or presenting the ring box on a serving platter. Another classy proposal involves filling her living room with candles, roses or her favorite flowers and then waiting for her to come home to see you down on bent knee. Other classic proposals that will never go out of style include proposing at sunset in a beautiful park or on the beach as well as proposing on a special holiday, such as Valentine's Day and Christmas.

Over-the-Top Grand Proposals

If your girl loves to be the center of attention and dreams of a grand-gesture type of proposal, go all out. You are only limited by your imagination. You could do the jumbotron proposal at a professional sports game. Although a bit cliche, it's always a crowd-pleaser and your girl will get tons of attention from well-wishers for the rest of the game. You could also make your girlfriend feel like a princess by whisking her away to Disney World and proposing in front of Cinderella Castle. Get a gospel choir to serenade her in front of a church. Take her to a dinner theater show and arrange to have the actors include you in a skit. You could also fly all of her friends and family into town for a party and propose in front of everyone.

Exciting and Adventurous Proposals

If your girlfriend is adventurous, you could send her on a scavenger hunt around your town or city, taking her to places that are somehow significant to your relationship. Arrange to have a friend at each location to give her another clue. If she's up for it, you can set up challenges that she has to complete at each location as well. The final will lead to you, perhaps at a restaurant, down on one knee. If the two of you are the active, outdoorsy type, you could go rock climbing somewhere you've never gone before and propose as soon as you make it to the top. Another idea is to go on one of those log flume rides at an amusement park where your picture is taken as you are taking the final plunge. Sit behind your girlfriend on the ride and hold up a "Marry Me" sign as you go down. Get down on one knee as soon as she sees the picture.

Work Proposal

You definitely need to get the okay from her boss, but a marriage proposal at work will brighten her day ten-fold and make her the talk -- and envy -- of the office. One idea is to dress up as a delivery man and hide behind a big bouquet of flowers you are bringing into her office, then propose when she sees you. If your girlfriend is a teacher, see if you can enlist the help of her kids. The principal can call her to the office while you and another teacher put T-shirts on the kids that spell out "Will You Marry Me?" Arrange the kids so that she'll see the message when she walks back in. If she works in a hospital, disguise yourself in scrubs and a mask and hand her what looks like a clipboard of a patient's paperwork but is really a note asking her to marry you.

About the Author

Based in Los Angeles, Zora Hughes has been writing travel, parenting, cooking and relationship articles since 2010. Her work includes writing city profiles for Groupon. She also writes screenplays and won the S. Randolph Playwriting Award in 2004. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in television writing/producing and a Master of Arts Management in entertainment media management, both from Columbia College.

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