How to Get Rid of Pine Sap

by Jordan Whitehouse

If you've ever gotten pine sap on your hands, clothes or hair, you know how difficult it is to remove. Pine sap has very sticky properties that make it bond to anything it comes in contact with, and unfortunately, you can't remove it with just soap and water. But don't worry -- you won't need to go running to your doctor or pharmacist for a solution; you should have the ingredients you need to remove pine sap in your own home.

Items you will need

  • Rubbing alcohol
  • Hand soap
  • Baking soda
  • Pain thinner
  • 2 clean rags
  • Hair dryer
  • Shampoo
  • Comb
  • Laundry detergent

Getting Rid of Pine Sap on Your Skin

Step 1

Pour 1 tbsp. of paint thinner onto your rag.

Step 2

Hold the rag with the paint thinner on the area of your skin that has pine sap on it. Hold it for about 10 seconds.

Step 3

Rub the rag around the affected area and wipe away the sap. Use a different portion of your rag each time you wipe some sap away -- you don't want to reapply the sap to the area.

Step 4

Wash the affected area with hand soap and water.

Getting Rid of Pine Sap in Your Hair

Step 1

Apply peanut butter to the area of your hair that has pine sap in it with your fingers. Cover an area that is 1/2 inch larger than the pine sap area.

Step 2

Blow-dry the peanut butter with a hair dryer to soften it. Use the warm setting on your hair dryer.

Step 3

Comb out the peanut butter and pine sap while your hair is still warm.

Step 4

Wash your hair thoroughly with shampoo. Rinse out the shampoo.

Getting Rid of Pine Sap on Your Clothing

Step 1

Pour rubbing alcohol onto the area of your clothing that has pine sap on it. Allow the alcohol to set in.

Step 2

Rub the affected area with a clean rag in circular motions. This will help the alcohol penetrate the clothing.

Step 3

Place the piece of clothing in the washing machine with your regular detergent and wash it in warm water. Don't put any other clothing in the washing machine.

Step 4

Dry the piece of clothing as you normally would -- in a dryer or air-dry it.

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images

About the Author

Based in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Jordan Whitehouse has been writing on food and drink, small business, and community development since 2004. His work has appeared in a wide range of online and print publications across Canada, including Atlantic Business Magazine, The Grid and Halifax Magazine. Whitehouse studied English literature and psychology at Queen's University, and book and magazine publishing at Centennial College.