How to Age Boots

by Mimi Bullock

Worn-in boots can have spots of disocloration for an aged effect.

Burke/Triolo Productions/Brand X Pictures/Getty Images

Transform a pair of new, shiny leather boots into a pair of worn-looking favorites by aging the boots yourself using household items. You can save money by making your boots look worn in at home -- by doing it themselves, shoe lovers can control how distressed the boots look. Whether aging a pair of Wallabee knockoffs or a thrift-store find, you can make any pair of leather shoes look well worn in.

Items you will need

  • Newspaper
  • Tennis ball
  • Tube sock
  • Rubbing alcohol
  • Spray bottle
  • Pumice stone
  • Sandpaper
  • Shoe wax
  • Cloth
Step 1

Wad up several sheets of newspaper and stuff them inside the boots. Lace or buckle the boots securely. Stuffing the boots helps keep the shape before you begin aging them.

Step 2

Put a tennis ball inside a tube sock. Place the shoes on a hard surface. Distress the boots by hitting them with the ball in the sock. Strike the toe and sides of the boot repeatedly.

Step 3

Pour 1/2 cup of rubbing alcohol into an empty spray bottle. Spray the boots with the alcohol to help distress the leather or suede.

Step 4

Scrub the dampened boot lightly around the heel, toe and seams with a pumice stone or sandpaper. Sanding areas where natural wear would occur will make them look distressed. Repeat the process on the other shoe. Rub very lightly at first, increasing pressure until you achieve the desired effect.

Step 5

Seal your aged look by applying shoe wax to the entire surface of the boots. This will protect them from further damage and lock in your aged look.

Tips

  • Some wear on your boots gives them a rustic look.

Photo Credits

  • Burke/Triolo Productions/Brand X Pictures/Getty Images

About the Author

Mimi Bullock's writing reflects her love of traveling the back roads of small towns and sampling the local cuisine. As a regular feature writer for "Southern Hospitality Traveler" and journalist for "Beachin' Magazine," she gets to experience the rich heritage of the southern culture. She is also a licensed cosmetologist who has her own skin care line.