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Frozen Breakfast Meals

by Amrita Chuasiriporn

From waffles to breakfast sandwiches, you and your family have a wide variety of choices when it comes to a healthy breakfast from the freezer. Whether you buy frozen meals from the store or make them yourself, the key is getting a healthy meal into your family while maintaining convenience in your busy lifestyle.

Some Assembly Required

The freezer section of your grocery store is filled with an array of complete breakfast meal options, from sandwiches to breakfast bowls. If your family doesn't like the store-bought varieties, assemble your own from the variety of individual breakfast items available. Individual packages of morning sausages, breakfast burritos, egg dishes, pancakes, waffles and pastries are some of the choices available. If you find they're lacking in any particular nutritional area, combine them for a healthy meal, or add your own sides. Consult the U.S. Department of Agriculture's MyPlate site for an easy-to-use graphic demonstration of recommended nutritional requirements.

Fruit Smoothies

Frozen fruit tossed into your blender makes wonderful fruit smoothies for a quick and refreshing take-anywhere breakfast. If you use berries or other fruits that still have their skins, your family will also get more healthy fiber in their breakfast meal. Some blends of frozen fruit are now sold as smoothie blends. If you feel creative, buy bags of your favorite frozen fruits and mix them until you find a combination you love. Add a little low-fat yogurt, milk or soy milk for a creamier texture and added calcium.

Homemade Options

Even if you only make pancakes once in awhile, make extras and freeze them. Let them cool to room temperature, then wrap each one completely in a piece of plastic wrap. If you know your kids always eat two pancakes apiece, stick a piece of parchment paper between two pancakes and wrap them together. Label them with today's date and the type of pancakes. Their flat shape should make them easy to store in your freezer. This method also works for waffles and homemade breakfast sandwiches.

Read Packages

The only way to know whether or not commercial frozen breakfast meals are good for you is to read the packages before you buy them. Look for products that are low in fat, but high in whole grains and fiber. Fruit as an ingredient is a plus -- particularly if there's a lot of fruit involved. Read packages also to help you avoid any ingredients to which a member of your family has food sensitivities. If you're trying to restrict refined sugar intake, look for low-sugar options. Be especially wary of frozen toaster pastries; some contain fruit, but also a lot of added sugar.

References

  • "The Professional Chef," The Culinary Institute of America; 2006

Resources

About the Author

Amrita Chuasiriporn is a professional cook, baker and writer who has written for several online publications, including Chef's Blade, CraftyCrafty and others. Additionally, Chuasiriporn is a regular contributor to online automotive enthusiast publication CarEnvy.ca. Chuasiriporn holds an A.A.S. in culinary arts, as well as a B.A. in Spanish language and literature.

Photo Credits

  • Ciaran Griffin/Stockbyte/Getty Images