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Food for Toddlers During a Fever

by Jill Davis, studioD

Even though a fever means that a child's immune system is busy fighting infection, waiting for a fever to break is miserable for a toddler. A fever is not a reason to panic, but because the child may not have an appetite, it's important to keep him hydrated and offer soothing foods so his condition does not get worse.

High Fluids

Keep your feverish toddler hydrated.

Keep a toddler with a fever from becoming dehydrated. During the first few days, she should consume mainly fluids. Fluids will not only hydrate her, but will also help her body cool itself. Include clear broths, fruit and vegetable juices, and ice pops. The child can have milk if no diarrhea is present. Flavored gelatin in the liquid state can be a treat for a child. Never force your child to drink if she is getting enough fluids.

Bland Foods

Include lots of bland food in her diet to keep her stomach from becoming upset. Soft-boiled eggs have protein and are easily digested. Add cream of wheat or soft cereals with milk after a few days. Offer soft fruits such as bananas and the addition of juicy melons to give her more fluid intake. A light custard is a treat for a sick child and easy on her stomach.

More Substantial Choices

If your child feels up to it and is hungry, include a small amount of tender chicken in his diet. Try a little at a time to see whether he can tolerate it. The protein may help him get a little of his strength back. Baked fish is another option if prepared with minimal seasonings. Cooked carrots or a baked sweet potato may help him feel fuller without being too hard to digest.

Foods to Avoid

Greasy foods are not recommended for a toddler with a fever.

Don't give your child anything that is irritating to his stomach or hard to digest. Stay away from foods with an abundance of fat, butter and oils, and fried foods, such as french fries or onion rings. Children with a fever should not eat high-calorie carbohydrates like pastries or cookies. Stay away from overly fibrous food such as beans, corn and broccoli. Don't give him spicy foods such as salsa or curry.

About the Author

Jill Davis started writing professionally in 2006. She has had articles published in "Yogi Times" and "Orange Pealings" magazines. Davis received a Bachelor of Arts in journalism from California State University, Long Beach.

Photo Credits

  • Buccina Studios/Photodisc/Getty Images