our everyday life

How to Fix Fresh Fruit for a Brunch

by Molly Thompson, studioD

Say the word "brunch" and many people envision omelets, bacon, sausage, and heaping platters of pancakes, French toast or muffins. If they think of fruit at all, guests might envision a glass of orange juice or a Mimosa. Add some color and a heart-healthy alternative to your brunch by offering an array of fresh fruit. Whole or in pieces, by itself or in a salad, fresh fruit is a healthful, tasty and easy addition to a brunch menu.

Wash all the fruit you plan to serve with brunch. Rinse berries and grapes in a large colander under cold water, then shake off the excess water. Clean apples under running water and pat them dry with a paper towel. Remove the peel from oranges and bananas.

Cut a variety of fruit -- such as apples, bananas, pineapple and various melons -- into bite-size pieces. Arrange them on a tiered serving tray or platter in an eye-catching pattern. Add some green, red and purple grapes, and some blueberries for more color. Serve the fruit with a dip made of vanilla yogurt with a little honey, or a caramel dip for a sweet dipping option.

Cut a large fresh pineapple or watermelon in half horizontally. Carefully scoop out the fruit from the rind and set it aside. If you're using a watermelon, use a sharp knife to make a scalloped or zigzag design around the cut top edge. Cut a variety of fresh fruits into bite-size pieces and use them to fill up the pineapple or watermelon shell for an attractive serving display. Or mix the cut fruit with a little poppy seed salad dressing or a raspberry vinaigrette, before scooping it into the melon or pineapple shell.

Make fruit kebabs with a colorful, small pieces of fruit and long bamboo skewers. Carefully thread grapes, strawberries, pieces of pineapple and banana slices onto the skewers. Arrange the skewers on a serving tray or stand them in a glass vase like a floral arrangement.

Items you will need
  •  Colander
  •  Paper towel
  •  Sharp knife
  •  Large spoon
  •  Serving trays
  •  Yogurt dip, optional
  •  Caramel dip, optional
  •  Small bowls
  •  Long bamboo skewers


  • Spritz cut fruit with a little lemon juice to keep it from turning brown.

About the Author

As a national security analyst for the U.S. government, Molly Thompson wrote extensively for classified USG publications. Thompson established and runs a strategic analysis company, is a professional genealogist and participates in numerous community organizations.Thompson holds degrees from Wellesley and Georgetown in psychology, political science and international relations.

Photo Credits

  • Ablestock.com/AbleStock.com/Getty Images