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Five Helpful Tips to Get Through a Job Interview Successfully

by Rick Suttle, studioD

Chances are you will face a lot of competition for jobs. Companies are adroit at selecting candidates with the right mix of skills and experience. This means you must perform your absolute best during an interview to be considered for the job. Five key interview tips can help ensure your interview success, and enhance your chances of getting the job.

Prepare in Advance

Prepare in advance for your interview. Review your resume so you recall key projects you worked on and what made you successful on them. That way you can better relate your skills and experience to the job. Research the company to learn when they were founded, what products they sell and how well they are doing in the marketplace. Review both the company's website and articles about the company -- any information you can use to demonstrate your knowledge and interest in the company.

Expect Certain Questions

Anticipate certain questions in advance, and practice rehearsing your answers with a spouse or friend. Companies are known to ask both common and behavioral questions, which you must answer according to their expectations. For example, an interviewer might ask you to "tell about yourself." Discuss why you chose a particular major and college, and then briefly cover past jobs and how you got to where you are today. Keep your response limited to one or two minutes, according to NBCNews.com. If you are asked about a big risk you took, describe the situation and with whom you worked. But choose an example in which you achieved positive results.

Prepare List of Questions

Create your own list of questions for the interview. You never know the approach interviewers will take during an interview. Some might ask if you have any questions at the beginning of the interview, and you will be prepared to answer that question. Ask your questions in a logical sequence. Inquire about particular projects you would work on, or with whom -- other department managers -- you would be working. Ask what criteria would be used to evaluate your performance. Toward the end of the interview, ask if the interviewer has any questions for you, which can help uncover any concerns he might have about your experience or background.

Use Proper Etiquette

Arrive about 15 minutes early for the interview to allow time for parking and finding the office. Be confident and sit up straight during the interview, and maintain eye contact when answering questions or listening to the interviewer. Smile even if you are nervous, as you want to appear approachable, according to Rasmussen College. Use the interviewer's name -- the one she used to introduce herself -- periodically when responding to questions. This helps you build a rapport with her.

Ask for the Job

Ask for the job before leaving an interview. Say something such as, "I really want to work for your company and know I could make an immediate impact in the marketing department. What is the next step of the interviewing process?" Asking for the job in this manner reinforces your interest in the job for the interviewer, and you can better understand what else is required to get the job. You might also ask how many people would be invited back for another interview, if there is one. That way you know how close you are to getting the job.

About the Author

Rick Suttle has been writing professionally since 2009, covering health and business for various online and print publications. He has worked in corporate marketing research and as a copywriter. Suttle holds a Bachelor of Science in marketing from Miami University and a Master of Business Administration from California Coast University. He is author of the novels "Hell Year" and "Suicide Peak."

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