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How to File for a Divorce in Trinidad & Tobago

by Melissa Patterer

In order to obtain a divorce in Trinidad and Tobago, there are several contingencies with which the petitioner (who must be a party to the marriage) must comply. You do not have to have been married in Trinidad and Tobago to initiate divorce proceedings in the country. However, at least one of the parties to the marriage must have declared Trinidad and Tobago as their place of legal residence to initiate proceedings. A petition for divorce in Trinidad and Tobago may be presented to the court if any party to the marriage is able to prove one of five facts showing that the marriage has been broken down irretrievably.

Wait a minimum of one year from the date of the initial marriage to attempt to file for divorce.

Visit the U.S. Embassy's website or another official resource that lists the conditions required for filing for divorce in Trinidad and Tobago (see Reference and Resources sections). Review the conditions that must exist in order to file for divorce in Trinidad and Tobago and make sure at least one applies to the marriage in question.

Verify that at least one of the parties to the marriage has legally declared Trinidad and Tobago as their place residence at the time divorce proceedings are initiated.

Contact an attorney to file a petition with the court for dissolution of marriage.

Tips

  • Upon proving at least one of the requisite conditions for divorce, the court will issue a provisional decree of nisi stating that the marriage has been irretrievably broken down.
  • After this decree of nisi is issued, the petitioner must wait for a period to be determined by the court in order for the decree to become absolute.

Warning

  • The court will not allow a decree to become absolute until both parties to the marriage have satisfied court requirements with regards to adequate provisions for child support and custody, spousal support (in certain cases) and property issues.

About the Author

Melissa Patterer has been writing professionally since 2009. She is the fourth contributing author of a scholarly manuscript titled "A Loud Bark But No Bite: An Analysis of Police Behavior at a Mass Gathering." She holds a Master of Science in criminal justice from Florida International University.

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