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Family Games for a Church Fellowship

by Grant Buchholtz

Church is made up of people; it is not the building. Fellowship is a vital part of church life. Games among families are ways to foster deeper friendship and love. They bring people together and allow people from all life stages to feel connected. Games allow people, from young children to the elderly, to get to know each other better and strengthen the fellowship within the church.

Who Am I?

Select a category such as Bible characters, cartoon characters, movie stars or famous athletes. Depending on the number of people present, write down various names on pieces of paper. Tape these papers to the backs of individuals so that they cannot see what is written. To find out who they are, they must ask the other players questions. They can only ask yes or no questions, and the other players can only answer in yes or no.

People Bingo

Each player gets a piece of paper with written statements on it similar to a bingo card. Papers can have 25 boxes or less, depending on the time allowed for the game. The boxes are filled with statements that range from family background, hobbies, travels, education, skills or random facts. For example, one statement might ask if the person can speak two languages, has traveled to three continents or plays piano.The object is to socialize and ask questions, matching people to their statements and have them sign off on the card. Once somebody fills out their entire card, they have a bingo. You can either stop at this point, or continue and have multiple winners.

Two Truths and a Lie

This is a great game for getting to know each other. Everyone sits in a circle and takes turning telling three things about themselves. Depending on the size of the group, this might require having multiple circles. Of the three statements the person makes, one of them is made up. For example, somebody might say that they have appeared on TV, surfed in the Pacific ocean, and have never tried sushi. Once the statements are made, everybody in the circle votes on which statement they believe is a lie. Then, the person reveals which statements are actually true. This is a fun way to learn more about people and hear the stories behind their statements.

About the Author

Based in Boston, Grant has been writing on issues of faith, leadership, and personal growth since 2000. He has written for the "Journal of Evangelical Homiletics Society" and "theooze.com." Grant won the Parish Pulpit Scholarship in 2009. He received both a Master of Theology and Master of Divinity from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, and has done further graduate work at Harvard Divinity School and the University of Edinburgh.

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