our everyday life

Eye Dropper Activities for Kids

by Christen Robinson, studioD

Eyedroppers are the perfect tool to add interest to a variety of activities while increasing your child's fine motor skills. Using the eyedropper requires your child to isolate the fingers used for writing -- a great exercise for pre-writers. All of these activities require little more than an eye dropper and paint or colored water, but they are sure to keep your little one busy for the afternoon.

Ice Melting

Combine science and art with this ice melting activity. Take an empty container, -- soda bottles or milk jugs work well -- fill it with water and freeze. Cut away the plastic and put the ice in a large dish to catch the drips as it melts. Give your child a dish of kosher salt, small containers of colored water and eye droppers. Help her sprinkle the ice with salt. Now encourage her to use the eye droppers to drip colored water onto the melting ice. The salt will change the melting point of the ice, causing it to melt quickly. The colored water will run over the melting ice, creating interesting colors and patterns. Encourage your child to build connections in her learning. Questions such as "Why do people put salt on icy sidewalks?" will help her build real-world connections with the activity.

Drip Painting

Eyedroppers and gravity can work together to create a masterpiece. Hang a large piece of paper on an easel or the wall. Put old newspapers or something similar underneath the paper to catch any falling paint. Give your child containers of liquid paint -- tempera or liquid watercolors work well. Your child can use eye droppers to drip the paint onto the top of the paper. The paint will move down the paper, creating beautiful art. Encourage him to use as much paint as he desires in a variety of colors.

Color Mixing

Explore the magic of color mixing with this hands-on activity. Give your child colored water in just the primary colors -- red, yellow and blue. Put an eye dropper in each container of colored water. Provide an empty ice cube container for your child to use for color mixing. Encourage her to mix combinations of the primary colors in each compartment of the ice cube tray. Ask her questions to encourage an in-depth exploration. How many colors can she make? How many different shades of each color? Exactly how many drops of red and blue does it take to make purple? Younger children will enjoy the activity as it is. Older children may enjoy recording their observations on paper.

Coffee Filter Painting

Coffee filters are the perfect medium for a variety of art projects. Give your child eye droppers and containers of colored water. Ask him to use the eye droppers to drip the colored water onto the filter. The absorbent paper of the filter will soak up and blend the colors, creating a beautiful final product. Use green and blue colored water to create a picture of the earth for Earth Day. Alternatively, use spring colors to make a blossom for a flower -- simply glue the filter to a paper stem.

About the Author

Christen Robinson has been writing educational content and materials since 2004. She also writes for eHow, Answerbag and Education.com. Robinson teaches special education, and specializes in working with children with autism. She holds a master's degree in teaching from Central Washington University.

Photo Credits

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