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How to Encourage Your Teen to Excel Academically

by Hillary Marshall, studioD

As parents, we hope our children will excel academically. This is particularly true when our children are in high school because the grades they get affect their college choice. Encouraging your child to succeed academically might be difficult if he is not interested in school. Knowing how to get your child on the road to academic success can help prepare him for his future.

Ask your child each night if he has homework. Help him with his homework if necessary. Limit distractions while he is doing the work. That means no doing homework in front of the TV.

Get your child involved. There are many activities and opportunities for kids to take advantage of in high school. Encouraging your child to get involved will help him later when he goes to apply for college. Plus, most clubs require students to get good grades in order to participate.

Organize your child. If your child’s backpack and workspace at home are organized, it will make it easier for him to work. Once each week, have your child go through his folders and backpack to remove trash.

Get ready for school at night. Have your child lay out his clothes for the next day each night. Have his lunch packed and ready in the fridge. Put his book bag by the door with his shoes and anything else he needs to bring to school. The less he has to do in the morning, the more likely he will be on time.

Feed him breakfast. Children who eat breakfast are more energized and alert.

Talk about current events with your child. Have intellectual discussions at the dinner table. Ask what they are learning about in school, and share your own interests, too.

Get to know your child’s teachers. Attend back-to-school night. Communicate with your child’s teacher if he has any special learning needs. If your child has a problem or is struggling, ask the teacher how you can help at home.

Praise good effort, not good grades. If you know your child studied and tried hard, don’t come down too hard on him if his grade doesn’t reflect that. Focus on what your child is doing well and help him out in subjects he is struggling with.

Give your child time to unwind each day after school. Don’t make him come right home and study. Avoid over-scheduling your child, which can cause stress and anxiety.

Ease up. If you micromanage everything, your child will never learn how to be autonomous.


About the Author

Hillary Marshall has been writing professionally since 2006. Before writing instructional articles online, she worked as a copywriter and has been published in "Ideal Living" "Sass" "Science Edge" and "Shopping Cents" magazines along with countless websites including Gadling a blog by the Huffington post. Marshall studied early childhood education at the Stratford Career Institute.

Photo Credits

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